Academic Advising Library

A Family Guide to Academic Advising

AUTHOR(S): Donald C. Smith & Virginia N. Gordon
PUBLISHER: NACADA, 2003

A Family Guide to Academic Advising
 

This newly revised guide from the National Academic Advising Association and the National Resource Center for The First-Year Experience and Students in Transition offers an easy-to-read overview of academic advising, a critical element of a student’s educational program. Written by a college faculty member and a veteran academic advisor, the Guide describes the role of the academic advisor, outlines the advising process, and highlights important academic issues facing new college students. The second edition includes a new section on first-generation college students and an expanded discussion of career counseling.


Academic Advising: A Comprehensive handbook

AUTHOR(S): Barbara Becker, Donald Creamer, Elizabeth Creamer, Steven Ender, Phillip Farren, Katherine Frank, Susan Frost, Virginia Gordon, Thomas Grites, Wesley Habley, Linda Higginson, Thomas Kerr, Nancy King, Margaret King, Gary Kramer, Michael Lynch, Betsy McCalla-Wriggins, Michael McCauley, Melinda McDonald, Victoria McGillin, Sidney McPhee, Charlie Nutt, Celeste Pardee, Ronnie Priest, Alice Reinarz, Delores Scott, Remy Sotto, George Steele, Pamela Stephens, Herta Teitelbaum, Lee Upcraft, Faye Vowell, Eric White, Carolyn Wilkie
PUBLISHER: NACADA, 2000

Academic Advising: A Comprehensive handbook
 

This 452 page comprehensive guide to academic advising examines the advising issues facing colleges and universities today. Thirty-four contributing authors examine the issues and make recommendations that will impact the effectiveness of advising and retention on your campus. Administrators and faculty will find the handbook invaluable as they strive to enhance advising on campus, and professors will like its comprehensive examination of the issues as a text for graduate classes in higher education administration, student personnel administration, counseling, and related areas.


Challenging and Supporting the First-Year Student (1st Edition)

AUTHOR(S): Upcraft, Gardner, Barefoot, and Associates
PUBLISHER:Jossey-Bass, 2005

Challenging and Supporting the First-Year Student (1st Edition)
 

First Sentence: In spite of substantial evidence to the contrary, the myth remains that first-year students are primarily middle class, eighteen years old, single, fresh out of high school, studying full time, enrolled in a four-year college, living away from home for the first time, meeting traditional standards of academic preparedness, and graduating in four years.


Helping College Students: Developing Essential Support Skills for Student Affairs Practice

AUTHOR(S): Amy L. Reynolds
PUBLISHER: Jossey-Bass, 2008

Helping College Students: Developing Essential Support Skills for Student Affairs Practice
 

There is a need for a book that fully examines the specific and unique awareness, knowledge, and skills that are necessary for student affairs and other practitioners to be effective and ethical in their helping, counseling, and advising roles. This book addresses the core assumptions and underlying beliefs that impact the helping, counseling, and advising roles and skills that are central to higher education. It synthesizes and integrates information from traditional counseling therapy texts and offers examples of how to utilize such skills within student affairs. Written for faculty members and professionals.


How College Affects Students (1st Edition)

AUTHOR(S): Ernest T. Pascarella and Patrick T. Terenzini
PUBLISHER: Jossey-Bass, 2005

How College Affects Students (1st Edition)
 

This is the long-awaited second volume of Pascarella and Terenzini's 1991 award-winning review of the research on the impacts of college on students. The authors review their earlier findings and then synthesize what has been learned since 1990 about college's influences on students’ learning. The book also discusses the implications of the findings for research, practice, and public policy. This authoritative and comprehensive analysis of the literature on college-impact is required reading for anyone interested in higher education practice, policy, and promises faculty, administrators, researchers, policy analysts, and decision-makers at every level.


Making the Most of College: Students Speak Their Minds

AUTHOR(S): Richard J. Light
PUBLISHER: Harvard University Press, 2004

Making the Most of College: Students Speak Their Minds
 

Why do some students in the United States make the most of college, while others struggle and look back on years of missed opportunities? What choices can students make, and what can teachers and university leaders do to improve more students' experiences and help them make the most of their time and monetary investment? And how is greater diversity on campus—cultural, racial, and religious—affecting education? How can students and faculty benefit from differences and learn from the inevitable moments of misunderstanding and awkwardness?

Two Harvard University Presidents invited Richard Light and his colleagues to explore these questions, resulting in ten years of interviews with 1,600 Harvard students. Making the Most of College offers concrete advice on choosing classes, talking productively with advisors, improving writing and study skills, maximizing the value of research assignments, and connecting learning inside the classroom with the rest of life.

The stories that students shared with Light and his colleagues about their experiences of inspiration, frustration, and discovery fill the book with spirit. Some of the anecdotes are funny, some are moving, and some are surprising. Many are wise—especially about the ways of getting the best, in classroom and dormitory, from the new racial and ethnic diversity.

Filled with practical advice, illuminated with stories of real students' self-doubts, failures, discoveries, and hopes, Making the Most of College presents strategies for academic success.

 

Student Development in College: Theory, Research, and Practice (1st Edition)

AUTHOR(S): Nancy J. Evans, Deanna S. Forney, Florence Guido-DiBrito, Florence Guido-Dibrito
PUBLISHER: Wiley, John & Sons, Inc., 1998

Student Development in College: Theory, Research, and Practice (1st Edition)
 

Student Development in College offers higher education professionals a clear understanding of the developmental challenges facing today's college students. Thoroughly revised and updated, this edition includes new integrative theories of student development, expanded coverage of social identity theories, a targeted focus on higher education-related research, a current review of student development research and application, and re-conceptualization of typology theories as a way to understand individual differences.


Taking Control of Your College Reading and Learning (1st Edition)

AUTHOR(S): Elaine Byrd, Elaine Carter, Stacy Waddoups
PUBLISHER: Cengage Learning, 2000

Taking Control of Your College Reading and Learning (1st Edition)
 

Taking Control of Your College Reading and Learning is a unique approach to reading improvement. Including both direct instruction and application of reading skills, this book presents a powerful metacognitive reading training program called BICUM (Be In Control: Use Metacognition).


The Status of Academic Advising: Findings from the ACT Sixth National Survey

AUTHOR(S): Wesley R. Habley
PUBLISHER: NACADA, 2004

The Status of Academic Advising: Findings from the ACT Sixth National Survey
 

Want the most up-to-date statistics regarding the delivery of advising services? Need the average advisee load for institutions like yours? Required to have comparable data for an accreditation visit?

In this monograph, author Wes Habley provides details that illuminate advising practice throughout the academy. The 6th National Survey on Academic Advising gathered data from over 1,400 institutions nationwide that reported on all aspects of advising practices and services. In addition to survey data, Dr. Habley provides observations and data-drawn conclusions that can help your institution.


The Undecided College Student

AUTHOR(S): Virginia N. Gordon
PUBLISHER: Thomas, Charles C. Publisher, Ltd., 2007

The Undecided College Student
 

This book presents techniques for helping undecided college students set and implement educational and career goals, focusing on a developmental advising approach and career development concepts. Chapter 1 addresses the origins of indecision, the characteristics of undecided students, and program interventions. Chapter 2 focuses on administrative models and scope of services, while chapter 3 discusses the types of undecided students, such as entering first-year students, major-changers, undecided upper-class students, and special categories of undecided students. Chapter 4 explains the developmental advising approach for undecided students, while chapter 5 outlines the methods and techniques of this model. Chapter 6 highlights model programs for undecided students. Several sample student surveys are included. (Each chapter contains a reference list.) (MDM)


Why Don't Students Like School?

AUTHOR(S): Daniel T. Willingham
PUBLISHER: Wiley, John & Sons, Inc. 2009

Why Don't Students Like School?
 

Kids are naturally curious, but when it comes to school it seems like their minds are turned off. Why is it that they can remember the smallest details from their favorite television program, yet miss the most obvious questions on their history test? Cognitive scientist Dan Willingham has focused his acclaimed research on the biological and cognitive basis of learning and has a deep understanding of the daily challenges faced by classroom teachers. This book will help teachers improve their practice by explaining how they and their students think and learn—revealing the importance of story, emotion, memory, context, and routine in building knowledge and creating lasting learning experiences.

In this breakthrough book, Willingham has distilled his knowledge of cognitive science into a set of nine principles that are easy to understand and have clear applications for the classroom.

Some of examples of his surprising findings are:

  • "Learning styles" don't exist: The processes by which different children think and learn are more similar than different.
  • Intelligence is malleable Intelligence contributes to school performance and children do differ, but intelligence can be increased through sustained hard work.
  • You cannot develop "thinking skills" in the absence of facts. We encourage students to think critically, not just memorize facts. However thinking skills depend on factual knowledge for their operation.
  • Why Don’t Students like School? is a basic primer for every teacher who wants to know how their brains and their students' brains work and how that knowledge can help them hone their teaching skills.