Careers

A variety of careers await as possibilities for students in the AVC department. Here is a list by degree type:

Art Education

Teaching art in a public, private or charter school, K-12 is the most traditional way of using an Art Education degree. Other options students might consider include: teaching online, teaching preschool (or daycare), teaching private lessons to adults or children, teaching art at an after-school program, running education programs and teaching classes at art museums, starting a non-profit arts organization, teaching at non-traditional organization, being a guest artist or teacher, tutoring, teaching assistant, substitute teaching, retail craft coordinator, writing about art, or consultant for art supply catalog or store.


 

Graphic Design

Students are prepared to compete for employment at advertising agencies, design studios, in-house design departments, publishing firms, printing firms, and for freelance consulting work (self-employed). Some students may also choose to further their studies in graduate programs. The types of job responsibilities could include branding/identity design, web and interactive design, information design and data visualization, digital and traditional publishing, advertising design and motion design.

Things a designer might create:

INTERACTIVE DESIGN
Conditional Design
UI/UX Design
Virtual Systems Design
Web Page Design
Mobile App Design

ADVERTISING & PROMOTIONS
Advertising design
Sales collateral (catalogs, brochures, etc.)
Annual reports
Signage design

RETAIL & EXHIBIT DESIGN
Environmental design/Retail spaces/Interiors exhibit design
Trade-show design
Retail environments
Point-of-purchase displays
Package design

BRANDING & BRAND IDENTITY
Corporate communication
Identity design
Sales collateral (catalogs, brochures, etc.)

INFORMATION DESIGN
Infographics/diagraphics
Data Visualization

PUBLISHING
Publication design/publishing
Educational design
Nonprofit design/Public service/Public awareness

MOTION GRAPHICS & ANIMATION
Film title design
Television/Video graphics
Motion graphics
Video game graphics

PLACES A DESIGNER MIGHT WORK
Design studio 
Advertising agency
Design entrepreneur/Freelancer
Web/Interactive design firm
Publishing firm (newspapers, magazines, books, journals, etc) 
In-House corporate marketing/Communications department 
Teach at learning institution

GRAPHIC DESIGN AREA PHILOSOPHY
In general, as part of the Department of Art and Visual Communications in The School of the Arts, the philosophy of the Graphic Design Area is to stress creativity over technical skills, and artistic communication and relevant concepts over software and computers.

  • Technology is important and will always evolve and change. Therefore, our area’s position is that students need to learn the majority of software skills on their own, as they will inevitably need to continue to do this throughout their careers as the software continues to change over time.
  • We believe the emphasis of the classroom activities and attitudes should support the philosophy of the human, artistic element of creativity instead software and hardware.
  • We stress that we are creative individuals (who may use digital tools) in favor of computer operators who use software in order to design.


 

Illustration

Students are prepared to compete for employment creating concepts, illustrations, backgrounds, textures and more in the areas of gaming development, animation, and for freelance consulting work (self-employed) creating illustrations for books (children's, graphic novels, etc.), magazines (both traditional and online), storyboarding, advertising. Some students may also choose to further their studies in graduate programs. Many employment opportunities will be a combination of freelance, part time employment, and/or full time employment. For example, a concept artist may be in a full time position for the duration of a large project but may freelance or be employed part time on smaller similar projects.

  • Fine artist (gallery painter)
  • Portrait Painter
  • Editorial illustration artist (Magazine covers and articles, etc.)
  • Advertising illustration artist (art used in product promotion)
  • Product Illustration artist (art used in product packaging)   
  • Narrative illustration artist (National Geographic type clients, historical scene recreations, etc.)
  • Trade paperback book cover artist
  • Children’s book artist
  • Graphic novel artist
  • Comic book artist
  • Storyboard Artist (video games and film)
  • Key shot
  • Concept artist (video games)
  • Concept artist (film)
  • Background artist (video games)
  • Texture artist (video games and film)
  • Matte painter (film)
  • Caricature artist
  • Comic strip artist
  • Political cartoon artist
  • Educational software artist (Imagine learning, leapfrog, etc. art used for content delivery within software. not video game art)
  • Toy and action figure artist (concept artist/designer)
  • Scrap book artists (not creating scrapbooks but the content others will use to create their own scrapbooks)
  • Greeting Card Artist (Hallmark. Etc.)
  • 2D animator (Television cartoons and animations, online cartoons and animations, etc.)
  • Courtroom artist
  • Forensic artist (may need additional education)
  • Scientific Illustration artist (may need additional education)
  • Medical Illustration artist (will need additional education)
  • Stamp Illustrator (postage and specialty)
  • Tattoo artist
  • Corporate artist (Disney but not in the film area)
  • Mural artist (museum backgrounds and the like)


 

Painting/Drawing

Students are prepared to compete in the arts arena typically via self-employment by promoting their work through galleries, museums, exhibitions, commissions fairs and festivals. Other opportunities include teaching private lessons and working in related fields in museums and galleries. Some students also choose to pursue graduate studies to further their development or to prepare them to teach in higher education. Areas of study include painting, drawing, printmaking, sculpture, and ceramics.


 

Photography

Students are prepared to compete in the photo area generally through free-lance work in areas such as advertising, stock images, weddings, documentary, portraiture etc. They may also look at in-house photography departments or studios. Students may also choose to promote their work to galleries, museums, exhibitions, commissions.


 

Sculpture/Ceramics 

Students are prepared to compete in the arts arena typically via self-employment by promoting their work through galleries, museums, exhibitions, commissions fairs and festivals. Other opportunities include teaching private lessons and working in related fields in museums and galleries. Some students also choose to pursue graduate studies to further their development or to prepare them to teach in higher education. Areas of study include sculpture and ceramics. 


 

BA/BS

A degree in art provides training in creative and critical thinking, problem solving and visual communication, providing a sound background for careers both in and outside of the arts. Careers could include working with arts organizations, museums, or non-profit groups. While the BFA degrees provide specific professional training, Bachelor of Arts students who have taken a number of classes in a specific area may also be qualified for jobs in the fields of graphic design, photography and illustration, or opportunities to submit work to galleries, museums, exhibitions, commissions fairs and festivals. 


 

AA/AS

Students can use this degree as a stepping stone to 4-year programs both within and outside of the the AVC department.


 

AAS Design-Illustration

The Applied Associate of Science is a two-year work-ready degree that helps prepare students for entry level jobs within the Illustration industry.  These could include jobs in gaming development, animation, and for freelance consulting work. Many employment opportunities will be a combination of freelance, part time employment, and/or full time employment. For example, a concept artist may be in a full time position for the duration of a large project but may freelance or be employed part time on smaller similar projects.


 

AAS Graphic Design

Students are prepared to compete for production design/entry level employment at advertising agencies, design studios, in-house design departments, publishing firms, printing firms, and for freelance consulting work (self-employed).  The types of job responsibilities could include pre-press printing, logo design, web and interactive design, digital and traditional publishing,  and motion design.


 

AAS Photography

The Applied Associate of Science is a two-year work-ready degree that helps prepare students for entry level jobs within the photography industry. These could include serving as a photographer's assistant, free-lance work in areas such as advertising, stock images, weddings, documentary, portraiture etc. Entry level jobs at in-house photography departments or studios are also possibilities. Students may also choose to promote their work to galleries, museums, exhibitions, commissions.


 

Certificate of Completion

This certificate is designed to build basic core skills for Art and Visual Communications. This could enhance abilities for someone working in a field that needs to better understand art to fulfill his/her responsibilities. Students can also use this certificate as a stepping stone to both 2 and 4-year programs within the AVC department. 


 

Art History Minor

This degree creates a more diverse skill set for careers related to the visual arts, as well as a more culturally rich knowledge base for careers outside the visual arts.