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Philosophy

 
PHIL-Philosophy
PHIL 1000 HH
Introduction to Philosophy
3:3:0
Fall, Spring, Summer

Designed to investigate major philosophical ideas from the Pre-Socratic era to the present. Students should develop philosophical skills through supervised analysis of readings in epistemology (knowledge), metaphysics (reality), ethics (values), and social philosophy. Emphasizes the articulation, assessment, and discussion of fundamental religious, social, political issues through class discussions, lectures, media, and writing projects.

PHIL 100H HH
Introduction to Philosophy
3:3:0
Fall, Spring
Prerequisite(s):
ENGL 1010

Designed to investigate major philosophical ideas from the Pre-Socratic era to the present. Students should develop philosophical skills through supervised analysis of readings in epistemology (knowledge), metaphysics (reality), ethics (values), and social philosophy. Emphasizes the articulation, assessment, and discussion of fundamental religious, social, political issues through class discussions, lectures, media, and writing projects.

PHIL 120R
Philosophy Forum
1:1:0
Fall, Spring

Introduces students to the interchange of traditional and contemporary philosophical issues in various venues. Provides enriched learning situations in which students may interact with noted guest scholars. Includes lectures, symposia, field trips, outreach projects, and activities oriented to engage students in philosophical discourse. Meets in conjunction with the Philosophy Club. Grading is on a credit/no credit basis. May be repeated for a total of four credits toward the AA/AS, BA/BS degree.

PHIL 1250 HH
Introduction to Logic and Critical Thinking
3:3:0
Fall, Spring, Summer

Introduces fundamental elements of informal logic and applies these to critical thinking. Covers subjects and concepts such as (but not limited to) definition, argument, fallacy, deduction versus induction, validity, soundness, induction, causal reasoning, abductive reasoning, analogical reasoning, and probability.

PHIL 130R
Ethics Forum
1:0:3
Fall, Spring

Introduces students to a wide variety of public policy and ethical issues. Provides enriched learning situations in which students are exposed to noted guest scholars and other lecturers. Includes attendance and participation at specified events by engaging in discussion of relevant issues. May be repeated for a maximum of 3 credits toward graduation.

PHIL 1610 HH
Introduction to Western Religions
3:3:0
Fall, Spring, Summer

For students majoring in humanities related disciplines and other students interested in the academic study of religion. Presents the comparative study of the history, ritual, "theology," and ethical beliefs of the major western religions including Judaism, Christianity, Islam, Zoroastrianism, Baha'i, and nontraditional religious belief in the western world. Explores similarities and differences between them by examining the primary sources and sacred texts along with the unique beliefs and practices of each tradition.

PHIL 1620 HH
Introduction to Eastern Religions
3:3:0
Fall, Spring, Summer

For students majoring in humanities-related disciplines and other students interested in the academic study of religion. Presents the comparative study of the history, ritual, "theology," and ethical beliefs of the major eastern religious traditions including Hinduism, Jainism, Buddhism, Sikhism, Taoism, Confucianism, and Shintoism. Explores similarities and differences between them by examining the primary sources and sacred texts along with the unique beliefs and practices of each tradition.

PHIL 2000
Formal Logic I
3:3:0

Introduces the basic elements of categorical logic as well as formalized propositional logic and formalized first-order quantificational logic. Includes Venn diagrams, proofs, truth tables, tableaux and translations from natural language.

PHIL 2050 IH
Ethics and Values
3:3:0
Fall, Spring, Summer
Prerequisite(s):
ENGL 1010; ENGL 2010/ENGL 2020 highly recommended

Challenges students to (1) explore and clarify their values; (2) critically read works of philosophy, literature, religion, and history toward understanding the basis of their ethical views; and (3) read, study, research, discuss, and write about difficult ethical issues. Focuses on issues of good vs. evil, justice vs. injustice, equality vs. inequality, and the necessity of defining and examining happiness and values. Engages students in serious reflection on issues of ethics and values as they relate to the students' own lives.

PHIL 205G IH
Ethics and Values
3:3:0
Fall, Spring, Summer
Prerequisite(s):
ENGL 1010; ENGL 2010/ENGL 2020 highly recommended

Challenges students to (1) develop knowledge and recognition of complexities inherent in global and intercultural issues, focusing on their ethical and normative dimensions with an emphasis on issues of ethics and values, (2) develop the ability to interrelate knowledgeably, reflectively, responsibly, and respectfully with a society of increasing intercultural connections, (3) critically read works of philosophy, literature, religion, and history toward understanding the basis of their ethical views; and (4) read, study, research, discuss, and write about difficult ethical issues. Focuses on global and intercultural issues with an emphasis on their ethical and normative dimensions. Engages students in serious reflection on issues of ethics and values as they relate to the students' own lives as knowledgeable, thoughtful, reflective, responsible, and respectful citizens within a society of increasing intercultural connections.

PHIL 205H IH
Ethics and Values
3:3:0
Fall, Spring
Prerequisite(s):
ENGL 1010; ENGL 2010 or ENGL 2020 highly recommended

Systematically explores the core issues in the realm of ethics and values, especially as they relate to life in the contemporary world. Focuses on good versus evil, justice versus injustice, and the necessity of ideals and equality. Emphasizes reading and writing skills at a more challenging level.

PHIL 2110 HH
Ancient Greek Philosophy
3:3:0
Fall, Spring
Prerequisite(s):
ENGL 1010 or ENGL 101H or PHIL 1000 or PHIL 100H or PHIL 2050 or PHIL 205H or PHIL 205G or permission of the instructor

Provides students with an overview of the history and evolution of philosophical thought from its origins in pre-Socratic philosophers through Aristotle. Reviews the influence of pre-Socratic ideas upon the work of Plato and Aristotle and the impact of Greek philosophy on the evolution of Western philosophy, science, and culture. Requires writing-intensive assignments.

PHIL 2130 HH
Medieval Philosophy
3:3:0
On Sufficient Demand
Prerequisite(s):
PHIL 1000 or PHIL 100H or PHIL 2050 or PHIL 205H or PHIL 205G or permission of the instructor

Provides an overview of the development of philosophical thought from the Hellenistic period through Thomas Aquinas. Covers the influence of Ancient Greek philosophy and the impact of Christianity upon the evolution of Western philosophical thought. Carefully considers the conceptions of God, nature, the human being, and morality advanced during this period; along with the profound impact Medieval philosophy had on the European Enlightenment and modern philosophy.

PHIL 2150 HH
Early Modern Philosophy
3:3:0
Fall, Spring
Prerequisite(s):
ENGL 1010 or PHIL 1000 or PHIL 100H or PHIL 2050 or PHIL 205H or PHIL 205G or permission of the instructor

Provides an overview of the history and evolution of ideas in Western culture during the modern period of philosophy from Descartes through Kant. Focuses on the dialogue between rationalism and empiricism, and examines Kant's attempt to bridge the gap between these two approaches. Requires writing-intensive assignments.

PHIL 281R
Internship
1 to 6:0:5 to 30
On Sufficient Demand
Prerequisite(s):
Permission from departmental chair

Allows philosophy students to receive credit for service as an intern in a governmental, not for profit, or private agency apart from their regular employment. Provides practical and research development in selected areas of service related to students' academic and/or professional interests or goals. Internship must be supervised by agency representative. Must be approved by philosophy internship advisor and department chair and written contracts must be completed and signed. Repeatable for a maximum of six credit hours toward graduation. May be graded credit/no credit.

PHIL 290R
Independent Study
1 to 3:0 to 3:0 to 12
On Sufficient Demand

Provides independent study as directed in reading and individual projects. Request must be submitted for approval by the department. Students may do independent study for one, two or three credits with a limit of three credits applying toward graduation with an AA/AS degree.

PHIL 295R
Directed Readings
1 to 3:0 to 3:0 to 12
On Sufficient Demand

Provides an opportunity for second year students to do in-depth research within the discipline of Philosophy. Study is limited to advanced work beyond that which can be completed in existing, available classes. A proposal must be submitted and approved by the department prior to enrollment.

PHIL 3000
Formal Logic II
3:3:0
Spring
Prerequisite(s):
PHIL 2000 and University Advanced Standing

Continues the exploration of first-order quantificational logic. Includes discussion of multiple quantification, formal syntax and semantics, proofs, truth-tables, tableaux, algebra of classes, set theory, and the metalogical properties of formal systems.

PHIL 3010  (Cross-listed with: COMM 3000)
Media Ethics
3:3:0
Fall, Spring
Prerequisite(s):
(ENGL 2010 or ENGL 2020) and University Advanced Standing

Covers ethical issues in media communication. Includes discussions of ethnicity, gender, nationalism, and conflict. Demands development of moral agency. Examines tensions between individual freedoms and social responsibilities. Addresses ethical questions in the context of current struggles within and over corporate and public media.

PHIL 3150
Philosophical Issues in Feminism
3:3:0
Spring
Prerequisite(s):
(PHIL 1000 or PHIL 100H or PHIL 2050 or PHIL 205H or PHIL 205G or PHIL 2110 or PHIL 2150 or instructor approval) and University Advanced Standing

Introduces students to various themes in feminist philosophy. Focuses on the concepts of sex and gender, including such issues as the nature, explanatory import and normative implications of biological sex differences, the sex/gender distinction, the idea of gender as a social construct, the structure and impact of gender oppression and the nature and value of the norms of femininity and masculinity.

PHIL 3160
Gender Values Knowledge and Reality
3:3:0
On Sufficient Demand
Prerequisite(s):
(PHIL 1000 or PHIL 100H or PHIL 2050 or PHIL 205H or PHIL 205G or PHIL 2110 or PHIL 2150 or instructor approval) and University Advanced Standing

Examines the impact of gender on specific areas of philosophy including, but not limited to, aesthetics, ethics, social and political philosophy, epistemology, metaphysics, philosophy of religion, philosophy of science, philosophy of language and the history of philosophy. Examines the meaning of gender with an emphasis on the diversity of experience across varying gender roles.

PHIL 3200
Metaphysics
3:3:0
Fall
Prerequisite(s):
(PHIL 1000 or PHIL 100H or PHIL 2050 or PHIL 205H or PHIL 205G or PHIL 2110 or PHIL 2150 or instructor approval) and University Advanced Standing

Acquaints the student with competing abstract philosophical problems concerning the general nature and structure of reality. Examines the history of and problems of metaphysics including, but not limited to: personal identity, causation, causal determinism, the nature of universals, anti-realism, realism, change, substance and essence, space and time, and philosophy of mind.

PHIL 3300
Epistemology
3:3:0
Spring
Prerequisite(s):
(PHIL 1000 or PHIL 2050 or PHIL 205H or PHIL 205G or PHIL 2110 or PHIL 2150 or instructor approval) and University Advanced Standing

Explores diverse theories of knowledge from within the Western tradition. Includes concepts of truth and falsity, skepticism, justification, identity, and intentionality. Discusses empiricism, rationalism and twentieth-century Philosophy of Mind.

PHIL 3400
Philosophy of Science
3:3:0
Not Offered
Prerequisite(s):
(PHIL 1000 or PHIL 100H or PHIL 2050 or PHIL 205H or PHIL 205G or PHIL 2110 or PHIL 2150 or instructor approval) and University Advanced Standing

Explores fundamental issues in the philosophy of science. Includes the structure of the scientific method, scientific explanation, and the epistemological status of scientific laws and theories.

PHIL 3450
Philosophy of Childhood
3:3:0
Not Offered
Prerequisite(s):
(PHIL 1000 or PHIL 100H or PHIL 2050 or PHIL 205H or PHIL 205G or PHIL 2110 or PHIL 2150 or instructor approval) and University Advanced Standing

Examines philosophical theories and models of childhood, their implication on contemporary conceptions, controversial social, philosophical, legal, educational, and political issues pertaining to childhood, and the capacity of children to engage in philosophical dialogue.

PHIL 3460
The Ethics of Human/Animal Relationships
3:3:0
Not Offered
Prerequisite(s):
(PHIL 2050 or PHIL 205G or PHIL 205H or PHIL 1000 or PHIL 100H) and University Advanced Standing

Introduces a comprehensive philosophical and academic investigation of the relationship between human and nonhuman animals. Develops and refines critical thinking and discursive strategies for evaluating traditional and contemporary philosophical, legal, religious, moral, and social considerations that inform human attitudes about nonhuman animals. Challenges students to analyze a range of pertinent topics, including, but not limited to: animal welfare, animal liberation, animal sentience and consciousness, animal rights, the animal ethics movement, the animal rights movement, religious attitudes, animals, animal law, and animal activism.

PHIL 3470
Pragmatism and American Philosophy
3:3:0
Fall
Prerequisite(s):
(PHIL 1000 or PHIL 100H or PHIL 2050 or PHIL 205H or PHIL 205G or PHIL 2110 or PHIL 2150 or instructor approval) and University Advanced Standing

Introduces students to various philosophical themes and figures unique to classical American Philosophy and American Pragmatism. Focuses on assorted thematic topics characteristic of American Pragmatism, as well as the work of the American transcendental school and various philosophical writings from American women, such as Jane Addams, and African-American philosophers, such as Alain Locke.

PHIL 3510
Business and Professional Ethics
3:3:0
Fall
Prerequisite(s):
(PHIL 2050 or PHIL 205H or PHIL 205G) and University Advanced Standing

Develops concepts and philosophies essential to understanding ethical concerns in today's business and professions. Presents current case studies and theories about business ethics and helps students determine their own attitudes about contemporary and historical business morality. Examines a variety of approaches, solutions, and methods of critically thinking about ethics in business and professions.

PHIL 3520
Bioethics
3:3:0
Fall
Prerequisite(s):
(PHIL 2050 or PHIL 205H or PHIL 205G or instructor approval) and University Advanced Standing

Shows how ethical theories can help provide frameworks for moral judgment and decision-making in the wake of recent scientific, technological, and social developments which have resulted in rapid changes in the biological sciences and in health care. Topics include: codes of ethics, ethical theories, and practical applications, such as: professional-patient relationships, genetic engineering, euthanasia, managed health care, end-of-life issues, abortion, and reproductive technologies.

PHIL 3530
Environmental Ethics
3:3:0
Spring
Prerequisite(s):
(PHIL 2050 or PHIL 205H or PHIL 205G) and University Advanced Standing

Presents a comprehensive, balanced introduction to the field of environmental ethics. Examines a variety of national and international environmental issues. Challenges students to think and write critically about classic and contemporary works on ethics and the environment. Analyzes ethical, scientific, aesthetic, political, economical and religious perspectives pertaining to the environment.

PHIL 3540  (Cross-listed with: RLST 3540)
Christian Ethics
3:3:0
On Sufficient Demand
Prerequisite(s):
PHIL 1610 and University Advanced Standing

Examines key developments and conceptions in Christian ethics through historical and conceptual methodologies. Explores the relationship between religious and secular approaches to ethics in their approach to questions of war, economics, politics, and/or other relevant issues.

PHIL 3550
Moral Philosophy
3:3:0
Fall, Spring
Prerequisite(s):
(PHIL 2050 or PHIL 205H or PHIL 205G or instructor approval) and University Advanced Standing

Surveys the history of moral and ethical philosophy from the Ancients to contemporary figures. Focuses on the following issues and theories: The good, moral reasoning and judgment, objectivism vs. conventionalism and relativism; natural law theory, ethical egoism, hedonism, virtue ethics, deontology, consequentialism, utilitarianism. materialism, moral sentiment, roles of emotion and reason in ethical and moral deliberation and judgment, as well as race, gender, and sexuality in ethics. Figures examined may include: Plato, Aristotle, Augustine, Aquinas, Hobbes, Shaftsbury, Hutcheson, Hume, Kant, Mill, Nietzsche, de Beauvoir, Sartre, Camus, Frankena, Rawls, Harman, MacIntyre, Held, and hooks.

PHIL 357R
Moral Reasoning Through Case Studies Ethics Bowl
3:3:0
Fall, Spring
Prerequisite(s):
(PHIL 2050 or PHIL 205G or PHIL 205H) and University Advanced Standing

Studies complex, contemporary ethical issues and develops an advanced understanding of principles and theories studied in other ethics and moral theory courses. Uses a case study approach to ethical inquiry and introduces students to the content, format, rules, and procedures of the National Collegiate Ethics Bowl competition. Required for those students who wish to participate in the regional and national competitions and provides a challenging opportunity for others who are interested in participating in exciting ethical deliberations and discussions. May be repeated for up to 9 credits for graduation with approval of instructor and department chair.

PHIL 3600
Philosophy of Religion
3:3:0
Fall
Prerequisite(s):
(PHIL 1000 or PHIL 100H or PHIL 2050 or PHIL 205H or PHIL 205G or PHIL 2110 or PHIL 2150 or instructor approval) and University Advanced Standing

For students majoring in humanities related disciplines and other students interested in the academic study of religion. Teaches critical thinking methods and strategies regarding traditional philosophical issues in religious belief and practice. Explores various topics including the traditional arguments for the existence of God, religious experience, the relation between faith and reason, religious pluralism, and the traditional problem of evil.

PHIL 3610  (Cross-listed with: RLST 3610)
Introduction to Christian Theology
3:3:0
On Sufficient Demand
Prerequisite(s):
PHIL 1610 and University Advanced Standing

Examines key developments and conceptions in Christian theology through historical and conceptual methodologies.

PHIL 3620  (Cross-listed with: RLST 3620)
Mormon Theology and the Christian Tradition
3:3:0
On Sufficient Demand
Prerequisite(s):
PHIL 1610 and University Advanced Standing

For students majoring in humanities-related disciplines and other students interested in the academic study of religion. Engages students in exploring the defining features of Mormon thought in relation to the broader Christian tradition. Examines traditional theological questions such as the problem of evil, the scriptural canon, the nature of God and humanity, and the role of ritual.

PHIL 3650  (Cross-listed with: RLST 3650)
Approaches to Religious Studies
3:3:0
Spring
Prerequisite(s):
(PHIL 2050 or PHIL 205H or PHIL 205G or instructor approval) and University Advanced Standing

For students majoring in humanities-related disciplines and other students interested in the academic study of religion. Teaches methodological approaches and critical thinking strategies in the study of religion. Explores various disciplines in their approaches to religious belief and practice. Includes the study of such thinkers as David Hume, Immanuel Kant, Friedrich Schleiermacher, Rudolf Otto, William James, Ludwig Feuerbach, Soren Kierkegaard, Max Weber, Emile Durkheim, John Hick, and Rene Girard.

PHIL 366R  (Cross-listed with: RLST 366R)
Issues in Religious Studies
3:3:0
Fall, Spring, Summer
Prerequisite(s):
(PHIL 2050 or PHIL 205H or PHIL 205G or instructor approval) and University Advanced Standing

For students majoring in humanities-related disciplines and other students interested in the academic study of religion. Addresses specific topics and theoretical approaches related to religious studies. Topics may include religion and violence, religion and public discourse, religious ritual, etc. Subject matter varies by semester and is repeatable for a total of 9 hours of credit.

PHIL 3700
Social and Political Philosophy
3:3:0
Spring
Prerequisite(s):
(PHIL 2050 or PHIL 205H or PHIL 205G) and University Advanced Standing

Addresses ethics on the social level by exploring a variety of answers to the question: What is the best social structure? Covers concepts of justice, equality, liberalism, communitarianism, capitalism, democracy, feminism, multi-culturalism, and other topics.

PHIL 3710
Philosophy of Law
3:3:0
Fall
Prerequisite(s):
(ENGL 2010 or ENGL 2020) and University Advanced Standing

Introduces topics in the philosophy of law, such as the role, nature, extent, and justification of law. Investigates challenging questions about the rule of law, civil disobedience, the relationship between law and morality, justice, equality, responsibility, and punishment.

PHIL 3750
Marxist Philosophy
3:3:0
Spring
Prerequisite(s):
(PHIL 1000 or PHIL 100H or PHIL 2050 or PHIL 205H or PHIL 205G or PHIL 2110 or PHIL 2150 or instructor approval) and University Advanced Standing

Examines the political philosophy of Karl Marx and looks at Marx's legacy for 20th century and contemporary philosophy. Topics may include: Marx's criticism of Hegel and Hegelian Idealism, Marx's philosophy as "ideology critique," Marx's "materialist" philosophy, Marx's critique of capital, and several of the following: early 20th century Marxist political philosophy, Critical Theory, structuralist Marxism, phenomenological Marxism, materialist feminism, and post-Marxism.

PHIL 3800  (Cross-listed with: HUM 3800)
Aesthetics
3:3:0
Fall
Prerequisite(s):
(PHIL 2050 or PHIL 205H or PHIL 205G and HUM 1010 or HUM 101G or HUM 101H) and University Advanced Standing

Studies aesthetics as perceived by the disciplines of philosophy, psychology, sociology, anthropology, history, and others. Analyzes art forms, including the visual arts, literature, music, and theater from the perspective of philosophers such as Plato, Aristotle, Kant, Hume, Dewey, Danto, Bell, Collingwood, Thoreau, and Dickie.

PHIL 3810
Existentialism and Phenomenology
3:3:0
Not Offered
Prerequisite(s):
(PHIL 1000 or PHIL 100H or PHIL 2050 or PHIL 205H or PHIL 205G or PHIL 2110 or PHIL 2150 or instructor approval) and University Advanced Standing

Explores two of the most important and influential traditions within modern and contemporary philosophy. Covers figures such as Kierkegaard, Nietzsche, Husserl, Heidegger, Sartre, Camus, Merleau-Ponty, de Beauvoir, Gadamer, Levinas, Ricoeur, and Derrida, and issues in epistemology, metaphysics, ethics and aesthetics. The course focuses in particular on the notions of subjectivity, agency, free-will, and truth.

PHIL 3820  (Cross-listed with: HUM 3820)
Philosophy through Literature
3:3:0
On Sufficient Demand
Prerequisite(s):
(PHIL 1000 or PHIL 100H or PHIL 2050 or PHIL 205H or PHIL 205G or PHIL 2110 or PHIL 2150 or instructor approval) and University Advanced Standing

Provides students with an interdisciplinary approach to the study of philosophy through literature. Gives students the opportunity to read some of the most engaging thinkers and how they offer differing perspectives through a variety of texts. Breaks down some of the strict divisions placed between philosophical and literary texts.

PHIL 3830
Deconstruction and Hermeneutics
3:3:0
Prerequisite(s):
(PHIL 1000 or PHIL 100H or PHIL 2050 or PHIL 2050H or PHIL 205G or PHIL 2110 or PHIL 2150 or Instructor Approval) and University Advanced Standing

Studies the interpretive methods of deconstruction and hermeneutics, two important traditions to emerge in late 20th century philosophy. Analyzes various works from the history of philosophy through the frameworks of deconstruction and hermeneutics. Tracks the difference between knowledge and understanding, particularly through the writings of Jacques Derrida and Hans-Georg Gadamer. Includes the study of other relevant traditions such as post-structuralism, French feminism, and literary criticism.

PHIL 386R
Topics in Ancient Philosophy
3:3:0
Spring
Prerequisite(s):
(PHIL 1000 or PHIL 100H or PHIL 2050 or PHIL 205H or PHIL 205G or PHIL 2110 or PHIL 2150 or instructor approval) and University Advanced Standing

Provides students the opportunity to study aspects of ancient Greek philosophy intensively. Focuses on an aspect of the thought of a particular philosopher, such as Plato or Aristotle, or on a particular theme in Ancient philosophy, such as Ethics or Metaphysics. Emphasizes close study of primary texts. Develops strong critical thinking, writing and rhetorical skills. May be repeated up to 3 times for a total of 9 credits.

PHIL 400R
Great Philosophers
3:3:0
Fall, Spring, Summer
Prerequisite(s):
(PHIL 1000 or PHIL 100H or PHIL 2050 or PHIL 205H or PHIL 205G or PHIL 2110 or PHIL 2150 or instructor approval) and University Advanced Standing

Provides an in-depth look at a great figure in Philosophy across the topics of metaphysics, epistemology, ethics, social and political philosophy, aesthetics, and other themes. Addresses the contribution of the thinker to the history of Philosophy. Repeatable up to 12 credit hours with different topics.

PHIL 4120
Philosophy of Education
3:3:0
Not Offered
Prerequisite(s):
(ENGL 1010 or PHIL 1000 or PHIL 100H or PHIL 2050 or PHIL 205H or PHIL 205G or PHIL 2110 or PHIL 2150 or instructor approval) and University Advanced Standing

Examines history, issues, and philosophical theories of education with attention to associated metaphysical, epistemological, ethical, political, and ideological assumptions.

PHIL 4130
Nineteenth Century European Philosophy
3:3:0
Not Offered
Prerequisite(s):
(PHIL 1000 or PHIL 100H or PHIL 2050 or PHIL 205H or PHIL 205G or PHIL 2110 or PHIL 2150 or instructor approval) and University Advanced Standing

Introduces students to the changes in 19th century European philosophy regarding the nature of truth, knowledge, human freedom, and nature. Focuses on the attempts of German Idealism to formulate a systematic science of reality. Discusses the possibilities and problems with conceiving truth as both complete and absolutely knowable. Analyzes the philosophies of nature, art, human freedom, society, and ethics.

PHIL 4140
History of Analytic Philosophy
3:3:0
Not Offered
Prerequisite(s):
(PHIL 2150 or instructor approval) and University Advanced Standing

Explores the history of Analytic Philosophy from the late 19th century to the present. Includes the study of such figures as Bertrand Russell, B. Bolzano, Gottlob Frege, Ludwig Wittgenstein, Rudolph Carnap, G.E. Moore, J.L. Austin, Gilbert Ryle, W.V.O. Quine, and Fredrich Waismann. Studies methods of movements such as Logical Empiricism, and Ordinary Language Philosophy. Explores views such as Logicism, Logical Atomism, Holism, Verificationism, Logical Behaviorism, Psychologism, Nominalism, and Realism.

PHIL 4150
History of Continental Philosophy
3:3:0
Fall
Prerequisite(s):
(PHIL 2150 or instructor approval) and University Advanced Standing

Explores continental European philosophy. Reviews Kant's "critical" philosophy. Examines Hegel's attempt to go beyond the limitations of critical philosophy by creating a systematic, dialectical philosophy. Examines the following traditions as responses to Hegel: Western Marxism, Existentialism, Phenomenology, Structuralism, Post-Structuralism and "Deconstruction," Post-Modernism, Psychoanalysis, and Feminism.

PHIL 4200
Symbolic Logic
3:3:0
On Sufficient Demand
Prerequisite(s):
PHIL 3000 and University Advanced Standing

Discusses the philosophical motivation for the formalization of logic. Introduces the metatheory for propositional and quantificational logic. Includes proofs of the soundness and completeness of quantificational logic. Discusses the philosophical issues surrounding the results proved. May also include some discussion of important results in computability.

PHIL 4300  (Cross-listed with: HUM 4300)
Environmental Aesthetics
3:3:0
Spring
Prerequisite(s):
(PHIL 000, PHIL 100H, PHIL 2050, PHIL 205H, PHIL 205G, ENST 3000, HUM 1010, HUM 101H, HUM 101G, or HUM 3500) and University Advanced Standing

Introduces students to emerging themes in environmental aesthetics. Evaluates concepts and attitudes toward nature including, but not limited to, the concept of beauty in natural and human-made environments from a cross-cultural perspective. Studies environmental formalism, cognitivism and non-cognitivism, as well as divergent spiritual, ecological, religious, and moral approaches to the appreciation of nature.

PHIL 430R
Topics in Epistemology
3:3:0
Prerequisite(s):
(PHIL 1000 or PHIL 100H or PHIL 2050 or PHIL 205H or PHIL 205G or PHIL 2110 or PHIL 2150 or instructor approval) and University Advanced Standing

Provides an opportunity for students to conduct an in-depth study of specific topics in epistemology. Topics may include the foundations of knowledge; the nature of justification; the problem of skepticism, and the nature of scientific, religious, and/or moral knowledge. Emphasizes the rigorous analysis of arguments and offers the opportunity for students to develop their own original critical analysis and argument. May be repeated for a maximum of 9 credits toward graduation.

PHIL 4460
Philosophy of Psychology
3:3:0
Not Offered
Prerequisite(s):
(PHIL 2050, PHIL 205G, PHIL 205H, PSY 1010, or PSY 101H) and University Advanced Standing

Offers an interdisciplinary exploration of questions that arise when psychologists explore cognition and behavior concerning philosophical issues and when philosophers explore questions that rely on empirical claims about cognition and behavior. Surveys topics such as situationism and virtue ethics, moral intuitions, well-being, emotions, moods, positive illusions and free will, automaticity, confabulation, mental illness and psychopathy.

PHIL 4461  (Cross-listed with: PSY 4461)
Moral Psychology
3:3:0
Prerequisite(s):
(PHIL 2050 or PHIL 205G or PHIL 205H or PSY 1010 or PSY 101H) and University Advanced Standing

Analyzes questions about how people engage in moral thinking and in moral behavior from the perspectives of the philosophy of mind, ethics and psychology. Explores topics such as virtue and character, reason and passion, altruism and egoism, agency and responsibility, and moral intuitions.

PHIL 4470
Philosophy of Mind
3:3:0
Not Offered
Prerequisite(s):
(PHIL 1000 or PHIL 100H or PHIL 2050 or PHIL 205H or PHIL 205G or PHIL 2110 or PHIL 2150 or instructor approval) and University Advanced Standing

Explores central questions concerning the nature of the mind. Includes such topics as personal identity, the mind-body problem, other minds, mental causation, and externalism.

PHIL 4480
Philosophy of Language
3:3:0
Spring
Prerequisite(s):
(PHIL 1000 or PHIL 100H or PHIL 2050 or PHIL 205H or PHIL 205G or PHIL 2110 or PHIL 2150 or instructor approval) and University Advanced Standing

Explores the central issues in the philosophy of language. Includes the study of such issues as truth, meaning, reference and descriptions, names and demonstratives, speech acts, metaphor and private language. Includes the study of such philosophers as W.V.O. Quine, A Tarski, D. Davidson, J. Searle, J. Derrida, C. Levi-Strauss, F. Saussure, L. Wittgenstein, K. Donnellan, S. Kripke, D. Kaplan, H.P. Grice, B. Russell, and P.F. Strawson.

PHIL 450R
Interdisciplinary Senior Ethics Seminar
3:3:0
Fall, Spring, Summer
Prerequisite(s):
Instructor approval and University Advanced Standing

For integrated studies majors and other interested students. Addresses ethical issues dealing with discipline specific subject matter, i.e., nursing, behavioral, physical, social sciences, etc. Subject matter will vary each semester. Taught by Philosophy faculty in cooperation with faculty of appropriate departments. Repeatable three times for credit with different subjects. See Philosophy Department office for specific topics.

PHIL 451R
Ethical Theory Seminar
3:3:0
On Sufficient Demand
Prerequisite(s):
(PHIL 2050 or PHIL 205H or PHIL 205G or instructor approval) and University Advanced Standing

Offers detailed investigation of selected ethical theories central to the Western philosophical tradition. Repeatable up to 12 credit hours with different topics.

PHIL 452R
Topics in Value Theory
3:3:0
Prerequisite(s):
(PHIL 1000 or PHIL 100H or PHIL 2050 or PHIL 205H or PHIL 205G or PHIL 2110 or PHIL 2150 or instructor approval) and University Advanced Standing

Provides an opportunity for students to conduct an in-depth study of specific topics in value theory. Considers theoretical questions about the nature of value, meaning, and purpose in human life. Includes the objectivity or subjectivity of value; the sources of value in human life; the nature and importance of art; the value of relationships, community, humor, and/or play; and related theoretical inquiries into the value of particular human activities. Emphasizes the rigorous analysis of arguments and offers the opportunity for students to develop their own original critical analysis and argument. May be repeated for a maximum of 9 credits toward graduation.

PHIL 481R
Internship
1 to 6:0:5 to 30
Fall, Spring, Summer
Prerequisite(s):
Departmental chair approval and University Advanced Standing

Allows philosophy students to receive credit for service as an intern in a governmental, not for profit, or private agency apart from their regular employment. Provides practical and research development in selected areas of service related to students' academic and/or professional interests or goals. Internship must be supervised by agency representative. Must be approved by philosophy internship advisor and department chair and written contracts must be completed and signed. Repeatable for a maximum of 6 credit hours toward graduation. May be graded credit/no credit.

PHIL 490R
Independent Study
1 to 3:0 to 3:0 to 12
On Sufficient Demand
Prerequisite(s):
Departmental Approval and University Advanced Standing

Provides independent study as directed in reading and individual projects. May be repeated for up to 6 total credits toward graduation.

PHIL 4910
Philosophy Research Capstone
3:3:0
Fall, Spring, Summer
Prerequisite(s):
(PHIL 1250 or PHIL 2110 or PHIL 2150), Senior Standing, and University Advanced Standing

To be taken during the student's last semester in the baccalaureate program. Includes writing a senior thesis, which points to post-baccalaureate career path or graduate school goals. Covers advanced Philosophy research and writing instruction. Encourages students to explore the ethical dimensions of their desired professional or graduate research interests. Involves the creation of a portfolio helpful in applying to graduate school or seeking employment. The portfolio includes the senior research thesis, an abstract of the thesis, three letters of recommendation, a Curriculum Vita, a Personal Statement, and a PowerPoint presentation.

PHIL 492R
Advanced Topics in Philosophy
1 to 3:1 to 3:0
On Sufficient Demand
Prerequisite(s):
(PHIL 1000 or PHIL 100H or PHIL 2050 or PHIL 205H or PHIL 205G or PHIL 2110 or PHIL 2150 or instructor approval) and University Advanced Standing

Examines advanced topics philosophy. Examples include ancient theories of political constitution, continental rationalism, empiricism, personal identity, free will, theories of truth and modal logic. May be repeated for a maximum of 9 credits toward graduation.