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CHSS Back to School Retreat

UVU Wasatch CampusOn Thursday, August 21st the College of Humanities & Social Sciences is holding its annual Back to School Retreat for all fulltime faculty and staff up at the Wasatch Campus in Heber City. The retreat begins at 8:30 with a continental breakfast. Departments then get a chance to break away and have some time for planning. During the break for lunch we will have visitors from all over campus come speak with us about how they can help, and we will provide a photographer if you are looking to update your professional page. The afternoon offers another opportunity for department break outs. 

The Wasatch Campus is located along Highway 40 just north of Heber City. Click here for directions. This is a great opportunity to reconnect with colleagues before the start of the school year, and the views from campus are always worth the drive.


 

Echoes of The Executioner's Song

The Executioner's Song

Utah Valley University’s English and Philosophy Departments are very pleased to welcome Lawrence Schiller, acclaimed filmmaker and Director of the Norman Mailer Center, on July 16, 2014.

Mr. Schiller’s connection to the Wasatch Front runs deep. In the late 1970s, he resided in Utah to research the context and conditions of Gary Gilmore’s shocking Utah County murders, followed by one of the most perplexing and highly-publicized Death Penalty cases in United States history. Schiller’s work substantiated the content of Norman Mailer’s massive nonfiction novel The Executioner’s Song, which in turn founded the script and production of Schiller’s film adaptation of the same title.

The impact of the Gilmore case on Utah County residents at the time was profound. Gilmore was convicted of two cold-blooded murders and sentenced to death; however, the United States had at this point discontinued penal executions for over a decade. When Gilmore, through his lawyers, insisted that the State of Utah follow through on the sentence, the nation turned its full attention. Gilmore’s death by a Utah firing squad generated social, cultural, legal, and aesthetic questions that cannot be fully obscured by time.

“I was fifteen years old the day Gary Gilmore was executed at the Utah State Prison,” said Karin Anderson, a professor in the English and Literature Department at Utah Valley University. “The season of his crimes, trial, and appeals opened a strange threshold to a new adult awareness; it was, for me, the year the ‘outside” world’ rushed irrevocably into my own private Utah Valley.”

More than three decades beyond the haunting events that first brought him here, Schiller returns to Utah this summer to direct the Norman Mailer Center’s prestigious summer writing workshops, scheduled for three weeks in July at the University of Utah. Many related events will be open to the public. Utah Valley University will host a one-day conference focused on the Gilmore case and Schiller’s powerful film. The Executioner’s Song starred a young Tommy Lee Jones and Rosanna Arquette. The movie was shot on location in the Utah and Salt Lake Valleys.

The conference is entitled "Echoes of The Executioner’s Song: Why A New Generation Should Listen.” All events will take place in the UVU Library Lecture Hall, LI 120. At 2:00, a panel of Utah Valley-based writers, scholars, and legal experts (including Michael Palmer, Managing Editor of Iron Horse Review; Rich Roberts, Civil Litigation Attorney; Nancy Evans Rushforth, Humanities Coordinator for UVU Integrated Studies) will comment on the crucial legacies of the Gilmore case. A screening of The Executioner’s Song is scheduled at 4:00, followed at 6:30 with an address by Mr. Schiller, who is happy to take questions afterward. The conference will close with an informal reception and light refreshments.

This event is free and open to the public. Please direct questions to Professor Karin Anderson of the UVU English Department at anderska@uvu.edu, or to Professor Michael Minch of the UVU Philosophy Department at MMinch@uvu.edu.


UVU Public Relations Students Earn International Awards

Hermes award

Utah Valley University’s student public relations campaign teams recently won three Hermes Creative Awards during an international competition sponsored by the Association of Marketing and Communication Professionals.

Two UVU student teams competed against some of the country’s most prestigious PR firms such as Edelman and Hill & Knowlton Strategies that submitted campaign entries for Coca-Cola, Cabelas, and 20th Century Fox Home Entertainment.

UVU teams were awarded Gold Awards for its PR campaign for “A New Way To Pay” for Fiserv, a Fortune 500 company, and PR pro bono work for “A Utah Valley Bachelor” for the Popmoney app. UVU students also received an Honorable Mention for the “IOUtah” campaign conducted for Fiserv. The PR teams spent the better part of this academic year conducting research and executing their campaigns.

“This recognition demonstrates that UVU public relations students have what it takes to work with some of the top PR firms and organizations in the country,” said Farah Sanders, faculty adviser. “Much of this is thanks to the engaged learning approach we are able to have in our classrooms at UVU.”

The UVU PR majors reached more than 250,000 people with their campaign work, increased user-ship of the app as well as transactions within the app. Erin Pierce with Adobe served as the teams’ professional adviser.

Hermes Creative Awards is an international competition for creative professionals involved in the concept, writing and design of traditional materials and programs, and emerging technologies. The competition has grown to one of the largest of its kind in the world.

“Our PR program has become increasingly stronger over the last four years through the efforts of our outstanding faculty. Both students and faculty have been honored at all levels from local to international,” said Janet Colvin, chair of UVU’s Communication Department. “We are very proud of the work our faculty and students are doing and the reputation that the PR program and UVU are developing for producing high competitive and stellar work in the PR field.”


 

Carol MorganCarol Morgan

Services for Carol Morgan

Our friend and colleague Carol Morgan passed away on Friday, May 16th, following a sudden onset of brain cancer. Carol had been the administrative assistant in the Languages department for several years. Our thoughts are with her family and loved ones at this time. You can find her obituary here.

A viewing will be held Friday, May 23, 2014 from 6:00 pm to 8:00 pm at Wheeler Mortuary (82 W 400 N, Mapleton) and on Saturday morning from 8:30 am to 9:30 am at the White Church in Mapleton, (31 E Maple St, Mapleton) prior to services beginning at 10:00 am. The family requests tributes and messages may be sent to Wheeler Mortuary www.wheelermortuaries.com