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Honors Program Courses and Curriculum

Honors General Education Curriculum Overview

Students should typically plan to take at least one Honors course per semester. Honors-General Education courses can be identified in the class schedule by the letter "H" in the fourth position of the course number (PHIL 205H for example). Honors core classes and cross-listed sections carry the HONR prefix. Courses may change each semester based on student needs and departmental resources. 

 

Honors Colloquium

Honors Colloquium Overview

A required course in the UVU Honors Program curriculum, Colloquium engages students in a series of intellectually and culturally enriching events both on and off campus. These include lectures, theatrical and musical performances, daylong and overnight outdoor education trips, as well as service and research activities. Students must attend the once-weekly class regularly, attend all required events, at least three optional events they select during sign-up week, and participate in a research group / service project of their choosing.

All students entering the Honors Program are required to take 2 OR 3 semesters of Honors Colloquium (HONR 100R), depending on the students' entry point. Freshmen (having earned fewer than 60 credits) are required to take Colloquium 3 times in their first two years. Juniors entering the Program (having earned 60 credits or more) are required to take Colloquium twice in their first year.

 

Colloquium Course Objectives / Curriculum

The main objectives of this course are to: (1) introduce students to excellence in cultural expression in Utah; (2) develop an appreciation for a multiplicity of cultural expressions; (3) foster an intellectually engaged community among UVU Honors students.

In any given semester, students can expect to choose from a large number of on- and off-campus events, ranging from lectures by scholars, performances by collegiate and professional actors, musicians, and dancers, exhibits at galleries and museums, documentary and feature films, outdoor activities, and overnight outdoor excursions. Colloquium offers students chances to engage their passions, try out new places, ideas, and experiences, as well as stretch their intellectual horizons. Because Honors spends a large proportion of its budget on tickets to many of these events, we do enforce a strict attendance policy. We are accountable to the university and the citizens of Utah for state funds we spend, so that students who sign up for an event and do not follow the policies below will suffer penalties on their Colloquium grade and may endanger their status as Honors students.

 

Ancient and Modern Legacies

Honors Legacies Overview

HONR 2000 (Ancient Legacies) and HONR 2100 (Modern Legacies) form the backbone of the Honors Core. Taken by incoming Honors students in their first two semesters in the program, Legacies courses connect students with their peers in the Honors Program and prepare them for the intellectual habits and skills that will help them graduate with Honors. Legacies courses qualify as elective credits for all degree programs.

HONR 2000: Ancient Legacies provides students with the opportunity to study selected great works in the history of ideas from an interdisciplinary perspective. Examines Ancient, Medieval, and early Renaissance thought through primary texts composed before 1500 C.E. Focus of the class is determined by the instructor, but must include at least one text written during each of these periods, and at least one non-Western text. Ancient Legacies emphasizes close study of primary texts drawn from disciplines including, but not limited to, astronomy, physics, biology, literature, history, philosophy, and religion. Ancient Legacies develops strong critical thinking, writing, and rhetorical skills.

HONR 2100: Modern Legacies provides students with the opportunity to study selected great works in the history of ideas from an interdisciplinary perspective. Examines Modern and Contemporary thought through primary texts composed after 1500 C.E. Focus of the class is determined by the instructor, but must include at least one text that adds diversity (for instance, in ethnicity, class, or gender). Modern Legacies emphasizes close study of primary texts drawn from disciplines including, but not limited to, astronomy, physics, biology, literature, history, philosophy, and religion. Modern Legacies develops strong critical thinking, writing, and rhetorical skills.

 

Honors Legacies Faculty

Faculty who teach Legacies for Honors come from departments all across campus, although primarily from disciplines such as literary studies, history, philosophy, and the social sciences. These professors teach for Honors because they want to interact with bright, motivated students and teach them concepts such as how to:

1. Gain insight about the fundamental questions and methods of investigation that are the foundations of academic inquiry.

2. Explain central ideas in Ancient, Medieval, and Renaissance culture (or Modern and Contemporary culture) and their relationship to present day society

3. Integrate knowledge from different sources

4. Increase facility in analytical and critical thinking ability through class discussion and written assignments

5. Improve at formal writing, oral presentations, collaborative exchanges and intellectual dialogue

 

 

Upper-Division Honors

Overview of Upper-Division Honors

Students entering the Honors Program at the Junior Entry point or those students who have successfully completed the first two years of the Honors Program need to create a four-semester plan to graduate with Honors. Depending on earned credits, students should complete between 12 and 18 upper-division Honors credits and a two semester Honors Thesis or Project. Transfer and Continuing students admitted to the program should meet with the Director.

Junior Year: Students work with both their Honors coordinator and an academic advisor in their major to make a clear plan early in their junior year so that they may complete all the necessary coursework for Honors graduation. In general, students complete at least two junior-year majors courses via an Honors Contract (see the Honors Program Student Handbook for more information on contracts). We recommend students complete courses already required by their majors, but that they do so via the Honors Contract. This "double-dipping" is completely permissible. 

 

The Honors Thesis or Project

An Honors Thesis or Project is a sustained inquiry or application of a focused idea or skills, allowing the student to develop subject-matter expertise, thorough research or practice, and intensive project management skills. It represents the culmination of a student's undergraduate experience in the Honors Program. All students must complete 6 hours from HONR 498R: Honors Thesis and/or HONR 499R: Honors Project. Students may begin their Honors Thesis during their junior year if they are prepared. If a student's major department requires a comparable course (with substantial written component), students may complete the same project for both courses.

Topics should be determined by the student's interests and based on a background of adequate coursework or other preparation in the area of interest. Frequently, Honors Program students propose interdisciplinary theses, which bring together several areas of interest and represent topics which might not encompass a specific program. Students will develop a formal proposal for a thesis topic during the first semester of HONR 498R or HONR 499R.

The Honors Thesis or Honors Project is a two-semester endeavor, which results in 45-50 typed pages of research, analysis, and synthesis (or a similar time commitment to a project with some kind of public component, e.g., a performance, laboratory research, scientific poster session,conference presentation, a workshop, publication in an academic or creative journal, etc.) on a topic approved by the student's Faculty Committee.

HONR 498R provides an opportunity for seniors in the Program to research and write on a topic related to their major, supervised by a faculty mentor. Includes independent research as necessary and culminates in the preparation of a written paper and oral presentation describing the results of the research project. HONR 499: the Honors Project may be substituted.

HONR 499R: Honors Project provides an opportunity for seniors in the Program to research, design, carry out, and report results of an original project related to their major, supervised by a faculty mentor. Includes independent research and creative endeavor as necessary, culminating in the preparation of two short written papers, one preparatory to the project (the proposal) and one evaluating or reflecting on the project's results. The Honors Project should be presented publicly, for instance, in a recital, show, portfolio, or other appropriate method in the discipline. May be taken as an extension of research pursued in HONR 498R and may also be taken as a substitute for the Honors Thesis.

 

Official Recognition

Honors Program graduates receive a special Honors medallion and a specially embroidered UVU green satin stole to wear during Commencement and Convocation exercises each May. Graduates are also celebrated at an Honors Awards night each April, to which they may invite guests. Transcripts for students completing Honors requirements will show the student's Honors coursework and feature the statement "Honors Program Graduate." In addition, a special seal appears on the student's diploma. 

 

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NAVIGATION AND LINKS

01. Honors | Home

02. Honors | Admissions / Application

03. Honors | Student Resources

04. Honors | Faculty Resources 

05. Honors | Curriculum 

06. Honors | Scholarships

07. Honors | About Us

09. Honors | FAQs

 

 

CONTACT INFORMATION 

Main Office: LC 204

Telephone: 801.863.6262

Fax: 801.863.6562

Email: HonorsProgram@uvu.edu 

Web: www.uvu.edu/honors 

 

 

FALL 2017 COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

ANCIENT & MODERN LEGACIES