Seventh Annual Death Penalty Symposium

6th annual symposium on restorative justice

   ORGANIZED BY INTEGRATED STUDIES & PEACE AND JUSTICE STUDIES

SCHEDULE

Nov. 3rd

LI 120
Library Lecture Hall

10:00-11:15 a.m.
David Livingstone Smith Associate Professor of Philosophy, University of New England.
Presentation:Less Than Human: The Moral Psychology of Killing”

11:30-12:45 p.m.
David Dow Distinguished Professor of Law at Houston Law Center.
Presentation: “The Arbitrary Nature of the Death Penalty”

1-2:15 p.m.
Eric Schulzke and Ben Anderson

Presentation:  “The Apollo 13 Project: Reduce Crime, Save Tax Dollars, and Improve Life Chances Through Better Dialogue, Data and Public Outreach

2:30-3:45 p.m.
Michael Minch
Director of Peace and Justice Studies, at Utah Valley University.
Presentation: “Justice as Restoration”

4:00-5:00 p.m.
Panel Discussion, with speakers and faculty: “Humanity and Justice: The Possibility"


Press Release 

 

Is it possible for humanity and justice to coexist within the U.S. criminal justice system? This question’s application to the capital punishment debate is the primary investigation of the seventh annual Symposium on Restorative Justice and the Death Penalty. Co-hosted by UVU Integrated Studies and Peace and Justice Studies, the conference will be held on Nov. 3, 2011 in the UVU Library auditorium, room LI 120. Designed to publicly deliberate the ethical implications of capital punishment, the annual Symposium on Restorative Justice and the Death Penalty examines current punitive justice methods and highlights an alternative approach known as restorative justice. Restorative justice is an expanding global movement intended to balance the needs of both offenders and victims by reconciling relationships.

 

This year's program will begin at 10:00 am with a presentation by David Livingstone Smith, a University of New England philosophy professor whose research into the biological roots of dehumanization recently culminated in the acclaimed book, Less Than Human: Why We Demean, Enslave, and Exterminate Others. Smith says that his presentation “will argue that dehumanization is a psychological process that allows us to override deep inhibitions against committing acts of violence to others, and explain the psychological processes that underpin it.” Smith will also explain why it is so important for people to be aware of the dehumanization process.

 

Following Dr. Smith will be David Dow, Distinguished Professor at the University of Houston Law Center and founder of the Texas Innocence Network, who will speak about the “Arbitrary Nature of the Death Penalty.”     

 

Other speakers will include Eric Schulzke and Ben Anderson, who will present information about the non-profit organization “The Apollo 13 Project,” which is devoted to helping reduce criminal incarceration and recidivism rates by encouraging better dialogue, data and public outreach in regard to offender reintegration.

 

Michael Minch, Director of Peace and Justice Studies at UVU, will then speak about restorative Justice. “Most cultures think of justice not in punitive terms, but in restorative terms,” Minch says, “I will give a brief account of this claim, and then, in conclusion, argue for a more historically and globally grounded conception of justice as restoration, one that better respects human dignity and connects us to most of the rest of the world”

The symposium will conclude with a panel discussion entitled, “Humanity and Justice: The Possibility,” where the speakers will be able to address each other’s arguments and answer questions from the audience.

This event is free and open to the public.


Promotional Materials

12x18 Symposium Poster
8.5 x 11 Schedule

Related Pages

The Death Penalty Information Center
Amnesty International
Apollo 13 Project Page
Book Review, Autobiography of an Execution
Book Review, Less Than Human: Why We Demean, Enslave, and Exterminate Others

Related Symposiums at UVU

Previous RJDP Symposia at UVU

1st Annual Symposium on Restorative Justice and the Death Penalty: A Personal Perspective from Death Row
2nd Annual Symposium on Restorative Justice and the Death Penalty: Sister Helen Prejean, Dead Man Walking
3rd Annual Symposium on Restorative Justice and the Death Penalty
4th Annual Symposium on Restorative Justice and the Death Penalty: Punishment and the Dealth Penalty
5th Annual Symposium on Restorative Justice and the Death Penalty
6th Annual Symposium on Restorative Justice and the Death Penalty: What Does Justice Require?
7th Annual Symposium on Restorative Justice and the Death Penalty: Humanity and Justice - The Possibility 
8th Annual Symposium on Restorative Justice and the Death Penalty: From Capital Punishment to Restorative Justice - Where Does America Stand?
9th Annual Symposium on Restorative Justice and the Dealth Penalty: Why does the U.S. retain the Death Penalty?

Resources

The Death Penalty Information Center
Amnesty International