Events Archive

Peace and Justice Studies Spring 2013 Events

March 21-22

ANNUAL J. BONNER RITCHIE DIALOGUE ON PEACE EXPLORES CLIMATE CHANGE AND VIOLENCE

http://youtu.be/TLjkRGKTNHo

As we heat the planet, both direct and structural violence rise too. Find out why, what a future without change promises, and what can be done to shift the patterns of destruction created by climate change.

Utah Valley University’s Peace and Justice Studies program will bring together scholars and experts from UVU’s campus and across the U.S. to discuss both the problems and solutions of climate change during the annual J. Bonner Ritchie Dialogue on Peace and Justice. This year’s conference, with the theme, “Climate Change and Violence: How Heating the Planet Creates Conflict and Death,” will be held March 21-22 in the UVU Library auditorium, Room LI 120.

The conference will commence on March 21 with a presentation entitled “Human Development, Anthropogenic Climate Change, and the Demands of Peace and Justice,” at 8:30 a.m., by Michael Minch, Ph.D. Dr. Minch serves as director of Peace and Justice Studies and is an associate professor of Philosophy at Utah Valley University. Sustainable development expert, Tariq Banuri, Ph.D., professor of Department of City and Metropolitan Planning at the University of Utah and former director of the UN Division for Sustainable Development, will follow at 10 a.m. Dr. Banuri's presentation is entitled “How to Integrate Climate Policy, Energy Access, and Sustainable Development.” At 11:30 a.m., Greg White, Ph.D., professor at Smith College and director of the Global Studies Center, will tackle climate-related migration with his presentation, “Are Climate Refugees a Security Issue?: Unpacking the Debate and Its Implications.” Investigative journalist, author on climate change, and faculty member at the SIT Graduate Institute, Christian Parenti, Ph.D., will speak on “Climate War” at 2:30 p.m. The day will wrap up with a panel discussion from 4 to 5:15 p.m.

The conference will culminate on March 22 with guest speaker His Excellency Talaybek Kydyrov and a screening of the award-winning documentary film, The Island President. His Excellency Kydyrov is the Permanent Representative of the Kyrgyz Republic to the United Nations. His presentation, entitled "Problems of Sustainable Development and Climate Change in Kyrgyzstan," will begin at 10 a.m. At 11 a.m., a free screening of The Island President will bring the two-day conference to a close. The film follows pro-democracy leader, President Mohamed Nasheed of the Maldives during his first year in office, as he changes international events while confronting catastrophic climate change and a rising ocean threatening the survival of the small island nation. The film was awarded the Cadillac People's Choice Documentary Award at the 2011 Toronto International Film Festival.


Fall 2012


INVISIBLE CHILDREN MOVIE: THE RESCUE

SEPTEMBER 13 | 10:00 AM - noon

Invisible Children is a group of activists moved by the conflict and injustice occurring

in Northern Uganda, where young children are forced to become soldiers.


CONFLICT RESOLUTION IN THE CRIMEA

OCTOBER 22 | 1:00 - 2:15 PM

ANGELA KACHUYEVSKI Ph.D.

Dr. Kachuyevski with Acardia University specializes

in international negotiation and conflict resolution and

international security studies. She has lived

and worked in Russia on grassroots

democratization and peacebuilding

initiatives.


8TH ANNUAL SYMPOSIUM ON RESTORATIVE

JUSTICE AND THE DEATH PENALTY

OCTOBER 25

8:30 AM - 5:30 PM


“From CAPITAL PUNISHENT to RESTORATIVE JUSTICE:

WHERE does AMERICA Stand?”

Student research presentation

and special guest speakers:

Jim Acker, State University of

New York, Albany;

Alan Clarke, Utah Valley University;

and Ted Wachtel, founder of the

International Institute for

Restorative Practices.


FIRST ANNUAL WRITING FOR SOCIAL CHANGE CONFERENCE

NOVEMBER 13 | 8:30 AM - 5:15 PM

Student writing workshop, faculty book discussion, and special keynote address:

“Change the Story from Wealth to Health” with Chip Ward,grassroots organizer/activist

and author of: Canaries on the Rim: Living Downwind in the West and

Hope’s Horizon: Three Visions for Healing the American Land.


PEACE AND JUSTICE STUDIES STUDY ABROAD SYMPOSIUM: HAITI, THE MIDDLE EAST, AND CUBA

NOVEMBER 28-29


UVU students will present research conducted while participating in PJST 2012

Study Abroad Programs in HAITI, THE MIDDLE EAST, and CUBA


Summer 2012 Study Abroads: Middle East, Haiti, & Cuba


Middle East

Program details: Experience the history, culture, and politics of the Middle East for three exciting weeks. Study at the University of Jordan in Amman; Birzeit University in Ramallah, West Bank; and Hebrew University in Jerusalem. Focus primarily on the Israeli- Palestinian conflict as well as social issues in Amman, Ramallah, and Jerusalem. Experience the ancient ruins in Petra, Jordan, and the rich history of the West Bank and Jerusalem. Interact with students and faculty as well as Islamic and Jewish religious leaders. Information Sheet

Tentative dates: May 7 – June 23, 2012; tentative travel dates: May 12 – June 3, 2012.

Program sites: Amman, Jordan; Bakka Palestinian Refugee Camp, Jordan; Petra, Jordan; Ramallah, West Bank; and Jerusalem.

Anticipated curriculum: Students will sign up for six credit hours from the following courses: Issues and Topics in Global History (HIST 420R), Issues in Peace and Justice Studies (PJST 475R), Issues and Topics in Political Science (POLS 420R), Survey of Current Topics (SOC 275G), Current Topics in Sociology (SOC 475R), and others approved by the directors.

Estimated participation fee: $2,995; apply by December 16, 2011, for this price. The program directors are making every effort to secure grants that will reduce the amount of the participation fee.

Participation fee covers: Lodging, some meals, in-country transportation, entry fees, international health insurance.

Participation fee does not cover: UVU tuition (approx. $150 per credit hour), airfare, some meals, passport, discretionary spending.

Directors: Lars Eggertsen, assistant professor of social work, 801.863.6731, larse@uvu.edu; John Macfarlane, advisor and adjunct instructor of history and political science, 801.863.6716, macfarjo@uvu.edu.

Application deadline: December 16, 2011. Deadline Extended: February 24, 2012. Submit application, two letters of reference, $195 non-refundable application fee, and $300 program deposit. If you miss the deadline, you are still welcome to apply until the program is full, but please note that the participation fee will be higher and program space is limited. Application materials are available at the International Center in WB147 or here Application, Letter of Reference, Payment Payment Card, Application Payment Card.

Financial aid: Pell grants and Federal Insured Student Loans may be applied to the program, based on eligibility.
Applicants must have a current FAFSA form on file at the Financial Aid Office (BA 105) and complete all necessary application forms for financial aid.


Haiti


Program details: Robustly academic and intellectually challenging, this program will introduce students to chronic and acute poverty, development, humanitarian assistance, problems in governance, post-crisis and international emergency response, renewing civil society, and more. Many of these conditions are uniquely fascinating and extraordinary in Haiti, the poorest country in the western hemisphere. Students will meet with NGO, humanitarian, multilateral, and governance professionals who know the facts related not only to Haiti, but those facts in comparison to many other regions and countries in the developing world.

Students who participate in this program will engage in 10 hours of classroom study before the two-week stay in Haiti, and then engage in another week of study upon returning to the United States. Students will produce development strategies and assessments related to specific problems in Haiti. Information Sheet

Tentative dates: April 23 – May 25, 2012; tentative travel dates: April 30 – May 15, 2012.

Program sites: Port-au-Prince and Saint Marc.

Anticipated curriculum: Nursing in Global Perspective (NURS 441G), Nursing for Peace and Justice (NURS 490R), Independent Study in Nursing (NURS 495R), Introduction to Peace and Justice Studies (PJST 3000), Issues in Peace and Justice Studies (PJST 475R), Peace and Justice Studies Capstone (PJST 4900), Philosophy Independent Study (PHIL 490R), Advanced Topics in Philosophy (PHIL 492R), International Organization (POLS 3610), Political Science Independent Study (POLS 490R), Intercultural Relations (SOC 3620), Social Change (SOC 4400), Current Topics in Sociology (SOC 475R), and Sociology Independent Study (SOC 490R).

Estimated participation fee: $1,895. Apply by February 3, 2012, for this price. The program directors are making every effort to secure funding that will reduce the amount of the participation fee.

Participation fee covers: Housing and meals for two weeks in Haiti, in-country transportation, some entry fees, international health insurance.

Participation fee does not cover: Round-trip airfare (approx. $1,000), UVU tuition (approx. $150 per credit hour), immunizations, passport, discretionary spending.

Directors: Gaya Carlton, professor of nursing, 801.863.8195, gaya.carlton@uvu.edu; Michael Minch, associate professor of philosophy and director of peace and justice studies, 801.863.7482, mminch@uvu.edu.

Application deadline: February 3, 2012. Submit application, two letters of reference, $195 non-refundable application fee, and $300 program deposit. If you miss the deadline, you are still welcome to apply until the program is full, but please note that the participation fee will be higher and program space is limited. Application materials are available at the International Center in WB147 or here: Application, Letter of Reference, Program Payment Card, Application Payment Card.

Financial aid: Pell grants and Federal Insured Student Loans may be applied to this program, based on eligibility.
Applicants must have a current FAFSA form on file at the Financial Aid Office (BA105) and complete all necessary application forms for financial aid.

Scholarships: Should funding become available for scholarships, application materials will be available at International Study Programs.


Cuba


Program details: At last, the opportunity to study Cuba in Cuba! We will experience life in the Caribbean while being engaged in a study of the language, literature, history, philosophy, and political thought and action of Cuba. Cuba has a history and culture created in response to conquest, external domination, and revolution. It is a creative mixture of portions of Spanish, native, and African heritages. Cuba offers an example of an effort to invent a society based on its own approach to government and justice.

Students will cultivate and improve their Spanish; learn of a rich and unique history; experience distinctive literature, music, and art; and examine a society and political system that diverges from most modern nations. We will integrate academic materials, in-class instruction by University of Havana faculty, meetings with Cuban government representatives, and first-hand experience with life in Cuba. Information Sheet

Tentative dates: June 25-August 10, 2012; tentative travel dates: June 27-July 28, 2012.

Program sites: Havana, with side-trips to Trinidad and Pinar del Rio.

Anticipated curriculum: Students will register for 7-8 credit hours.

Three credits in history or social science: select from Issues and Topics in Global History (HIST 420R), Independent Study (HIST 290R, HIST 490R, POLS 490R, SOC 490R), Survey of Current Topics (SOC 275R), Current Topics in Sociology (SOC 475R).

Three or four credits in Spanish: select from Beginning Spanish I (SPAN 1010), Beginning Spanish II (SPAN 1020), Intermediate Spanish I (Spanish 2010), Intermediate Spanish II (SPAN 202G), Spanish Conversation and Composition I (SPAN 3030), Spanish Conversation and Composition II (SPAN 3040), Topics in Hispanic Literature (SPAN 460R), Special Topics in Hispanic Studies (SPAN 484R).
One credit in Language 291R—Independent Study.

Estimated participation fee: $2,995. Apply by January 27, 2012, for this price.

Participation fee covers: Housing, most meals, course instruction and texts, visa, side-trip transportation, international health insurance.

Participation fee does not cover: UVU tuition (approx. $150 per credit hour), airfare and Cuban health insurance, some meals, public transportation, entry fees, passport, discretionary spending.

Directors: Greg Briscoe, associate professor of Spanish, 801.863.7224, briscogr@uvu.edu; Lynn England, lecturer of history and political science, 801.863.8119, lynn.england@uvu.edu.

Application deadline: January 27, 2012. Deadline Extended: February 24, 2012. Submit application, two letters of reference, $195 non-refundable application fee, and $300 program deposit. If you miss the deadline, you are still welcome to apply until the program is full, but please note that the participation fee will be higher and program space is limited. Application materials are available at the International Center in WB147 or here: Application, Letter of Reference, Program Payment Card, Application Payment Card.

Financial aid: Pell grants and Federal Insured Student Loans may be applied to this program, based on eligibility.
Applicants must have a current FAFSA form on file at the Financial Aid Office (BA105) and complete all necessary application forms for financial aid.

Scholarships: UVU will provide need-based scholarships to qualified participants. For an application, click here.

Fall 2011:

Fall 2011 Events Poster


Summer 2011:

Study Abroad - Northern Ireland

Program details: This program will immerse the student into the centuries-old conflict in Northern Ireland, but more importantly, into the structures of peacebuilding and conflict transformation that have recently rescued Northern Ireland from violence. Northern Ireland is the world’s premier laboratory for peacebuilding in a post-conflict society. Students will not simply learn about Northern Ireland, but they will learn how conflict transformation occurs, using Northern Ireland as a case study. Students will learn from some of the world’s most highly regarded experts in peacebuilding, and, in addition to scholars, students will meet with political figures, activists, former paramilitary members, community leaders, clergy, and others. Northern Ireland is safe, as the peacebuilding process has been, and continues to be, successful.

Tentative dates: May 9-August 12, 2011; tentative travel dates: May 28-June 22, 2011.

Program sites: The program will include learning from faculty at the Irish School for Ecumenics (ISE), the Institute for Conflict Resolution (INCORE) at the University of Ulster, and the Corrymeela Community. Students will also visit famous cultural and natural sites. Most of the program will be located in Belfast and Derry, but other locations will also be visited, including Dublin.

Anticipated curriculum: This program is offered for six credit hours in the following courses: Ethics and Values (PHIL 2050 or PHIL 205G), Survey of Current Topics (SOC 275G), Issues in Peace and Justice Studies (PJST 475R), Peace and Justice Studies Capstone (PJST 4900), Issues in Religious Studies (PHIL 366R), Interdisciplinary Senior Ethics Seminar (PHIL 450R), Independent Study (PHIL 490R, POLS 490R, SOC 490R), Philosophy Research Capstone (PHIL 4910), Advanced Topics in Philosophy (PHIL 492R), Senior Seminar (POLS 4990), Social Change (SOC 4400), and Current Topics in Sociology (SOC 475R).

Director: Michael Minch, director of peace and justice studies LA 121h, mminch@uvu.edu, 801.863.7482; Jeff Torlina, professor of sociology LA 012w, torlinje@uvu.edu, 801.863.8585.


Fall 2010:

September 21:

"Minorities in China: The Case of the Uyghurs." Rebiya Kadeer, President of the American Uyghurs Association. LI 120, 11:15-12:45 (Cosponsored with the Center for the Study of Ethics)

September 28:

"The Global Problem of Land Mines," presented by Mine Action, a Washington, D.C. NGO dedicated to retrieving and disarming land mines around the world. LI 120, 10:00-11:15

"The Cambodian Children's Fund," and what it does to pull children out of poverty and into hope. Filmmaker and producer Trent Harris. LI 120, 1:00-2:15

October 5:

Liberty in North Korea (LiNK). Rescuing those seeking freedom from totalitarianism. Documentary Film and Discussion, with activists from LiNK. LI 120, 1:00-2:15

October 8:

"Exposed: Nuclear Testing, Downwinders, and Activism." Mary Dickson, Award-winning writer, journalist, activist, and playwright. Director of Creative Services at KUED Channel 7 and host of "Contact." Mary's play "Exposed," was nominated as the Best New Play Produced Outside New York by the American Theatre Critics Association. LI 120, 11:00-12:30

October 19:

"Competing Loyalties: Religion in Communist China." Dr. L. Christopher Reardon, with Melissa Inouye and Michael Ing. Library Timpanogas Room, 1:00-2:15 (Cosponsored with Religious Studies)

November 9:

The Annual Restorative Justice and Death Penalty Symposium LI 120, 8:30-5:15

8:30-9:45 "Rooted within Restorative Justice for Death Penalty Cases: Defense Initiated Victim Outreach." LaVarr McBride, Twenty-six years experience in state corrections, including work as death row guard.

10:00-11:15 "Should we put Utah's death penalty on the chopping block?" Ralph Dellapaina, Founder and Director of Utahns for Alternatives to the Death Penalty.

1:00-2:15 "Presumed Guilty: A Story of Supreme Injustice, Survival and Hope on America's Death Row." Juan Melendez, Spent seventeen years on death row for a crime he did NOT commit.

2:30-3:45 "Who Deserves to Die and Why?" Robert Blecker, Retributivist advocate of the death penalty.

4:00-5:15 Panel Discussion

November 10:

The Helen Foster Snow Story. Documentary Film and Discussion, with the directors Dodge Billingsley and Dr. Eric Hyer. LI 120, 11:00-12:30

November 17:

"Threats of the Second Nuclear Age." Rolf Mowatt-Larssen, former Director of Intelligence and Counterintelligence at the U.S. Department of Energy. LI 120, 10:00-10:50

November 16:

Invisible Children: Stealing children out of the killing fields, bringing them into the school house and university in Northern Uganda. Documentary Film and Discussion, with a former child soldier. LI 120, 2:30-3:45


Spring 2010:

APRIL 1:

Tom Regan on the Basis for Animal Rights in LI 120, 1:00-2:15, and Panel discusison with Marc Bekoff and Shannon Keith, 2:30-3:15

April 14:

God and Human Rights: Are Faith or Foundations Necessary? In LI 120

9:00-9:50 Martin Palous, Czech Ambassador tot he UN and political philosopher

"God and Human Rights"

10:00-10:50 David Wash, professor of politics, Catholic University of America

"Politics of the Person: Is God a Liberal?"

11:00- 11:50 Responses by Ivan Kenneally, Ralph Hancock (BYU), and Michael Minch (UVU)

1:00-1:50 Ivan Kenneally (Rochester University)

"International Human Rights: Beyond Politics?"

2:00-2:50 Bruce Landesman, political philosopher, University of Utah

"Human Rights without Foundations"

3:00-3:50 Roundtable Discussion and audience questions

April 15:

James Lerager, "Nuclear Weaponry and Nuclear Testing: A Visual and Historical Perspective" In LI 120, 1:00-2:15

April 21:

Liberty in North Korea (LINK) film and discussion in LI 120, 12:00-3:00


Spring 2009:

2009 J. Bonner Ritchie Dialogue on Peace and Justice (pdf)


Fall 2008:

Fall 2008 Events Brochure(pdf)


Spring 2008:

Third Annual Dialogue on Peace and Justice (pdf)

Downloads for Third Annual Dialogue on Peace and Justice:

Third Annual Dialogue on Peace and Justice Brochure (pdf)

Third Annual Dialogue on Peace and Justice Poster (pdf)

Third Annual Dialogue on Peace and Justice Visitng Author Information (pdf)

Third Annual Dialogue on Peace and Justice Schedule (pdf)