Peace and Justice Studies 2014-2015 Events

Wednesday, September 10, 2014: “Apologies Without Forgiveness: Communal Pathways for Atonements”

Dr. Kara Barnette (Westminster College)
(co-sponsored with the Philosophy Club)
10:00-11:30 AM, LI 120


Historical atrocities present communities with a variety of challenges. The path to forgiveness after a historical atrocity is a particularly difficult challenge to achieving sustainable peace for a community. Join Dr. Barnette for a discussion on communal atonement and forgiveness after historical atrocities on September 11th, 2014 at 10:00 AM in LI 120.

Thursday, September 11, 2014: “Healing 9/11: Rendition, Torture, and Guantanamo”

David Irvine, Amos Guiora, Leah Farrell, Rocky Anderson
(co-sponsored with the Peace Action Coalition)
7:00-8:00 PM, Salt Lake Main Library

U.S. government documents  show that after 9/11, many hundreds of people were abused or tortured by the CIA and Department of Defense. Approximately 200 people died in U.S. custody, including at least a dozen during or shortly after interrogations. The records show that these illegal policies and actions were devised and approved at the highest levels of the Bush administration – but our nation has done little to make amends for the crimes committed, or to hold to account those who orchestrated the torture program.  The panel discussion will examine the history of these programs and also attempt to address the question what can we, as the American public, do to encourage the closing of Guantanamo and make sure that the U.S. never again engages in rendition and torture.

Thursday, September 18, 2014: “The Past & Future of Civil Resistance”

Dr. Erica Chenoweth (University of Denver)
11:30-1:00 PM, LI 120

Erica Chenoweth is an Associate Professor and Director for the Program on Terrorism & Insurgency Research at the Sié Chéou-Kang Center for International Security & Diplomacy at the Josef Korbel School of International Studies, University of Denver.  She is also an Associate Senior Researcher, at the Peace Research Institute, Oslo (PRIO).  She is the co-author of Why Civil Resistance Works: The Strategic Logic of Nonviolent Conflict, with Maria J. Stephan; winner of the 2013 Grawemeyer Award for Ideas Improving World Order; winner of the 2012 Woodrow Wilson Foundation Award, American Political Science Association; and the 2011 Book of the Year, The Guardian.  Foreign Policy named her one of the Top 100 Global Thinkers in 2013.

Monday, September 22, 2014: Film Screening: Mandela: Long Walk to Freedom with Panel Discussion

Ethics Awareness Week
(co-sponsored with The Center for the Study of Ethics)
11:00-2:00 PM, LI 120

Friday October 3, 2014: Live More with Less: Sustainable Wasatch Conference

1:30-6:30 PM, SB 134

Humankind is facing a radical future. We can either continue with rising emissions and reap the radical repercussions of severe climate change, or we reduce CO2 emissions radically. What should individuals do if governments and businesses are too slow in making the necessary radical transformations? In order to prevent unacceptable harm for our children and grandchildren, it is the ethical duty of those living comfortable and affluent lives to drastically reduce our consumption of “stuff”, immediately. We cannot wait until society makes such behavior changes obligatory.  Instead we must prepare the ground for the necessary legal and cultural changes by our own responsible individual activity.

Thursday, October 9, 2014: “Justice, Forgiveness, Human Rights & The Summit Knowledge & Action Network”

Kweku Mandela (The Mandela Foundation)
12:00-12:50 PM, Grande Ballroom

Kweku Mandela, grandson of Nelson Mandela was born in Transkei, South Africa, and grew up in America.  He attended APA International Film School in Sydney and is active in the South African Film and Entertainment industries, directing and producing projects with his company Out Of Africa Entertainment.  Kweku is co-founder of Africa Rising, an NGO that contributes to the development of the African continent.

Lehka Singh (Aidmatrix)
2:30-3:00 PM, Grande Ballroom

Lekha Singh is founder of Aidmatrix, which pioneered the use of innovative technology to change the way aid is delivered both in disaster relief and in day to day needs. In addition, Singh is a fine-art photographer and documentary producer.  Her works have been featured in National Geographic and Huffington Post.  Signh’s documentaries include Square and Midway and Beyond Right & Wrong.

Film Screening: Beyond Right & Wrong: Stories of Justice & Forgivenesswith Panel Discussion
3:00-5:00 PM, Grande Ballroom

Thursday, October 23, 2014: 10th Annual Restorative Justice & Death Penalty Symposium

8:00 AM-5:00 PM, LI 120

The 10th Annual Restorative Justice & Death Penalty Symposium focuses on a restorative justice and death penalty issues. Presentations include: Researching Utahan’s Attitudes Toward the Death Penalty (Tyler McDonald, UVU); Peacebuilding Through Restorative Dialogue: A Social Movement in the Global Community (Dr. Mark Umbreit, Center for Restorative Justice & Peacemaking, University of Minnesota); Who Benefits When the State Executes Murderers? (David Dow, Distinguished Professor of Law, Houston Law Center); and Autonomy in Extremis: An Intelligent Waiver  of Appeals on Death Row (Dr. Sandy McGuningall-Smith, Behavioral Science, UVU).


Wednesday, October 29: 2014: Jon Sebba (Anti)-War Poetry Reading and Discussion

1:00-1:50 PM, LI 120

Jon Sebba has been writing poetry since the 1970’s. His poetry focuses on his war experiences as a young man, and his urgent crusade for peace.  In early 2013, he had play produced at the Gallery Theater in Ogden. He has written a movie script and is curently writing a novel. Both stories are based on the lives of people he knew during his teenage years in South Africa under apartheid.  Jon is the 2013 Utah State Poetry Society Poet of the Year.

Thursday, October 30, 2014: “Until Rulers Obey: Voices from Latin American Social Movements”

Clif Ross & Marcy Rein
10:00-11:30 AM, LI 120

Authors Clifton Ross and Marcy Rein bring together voices from the movements behind the wave of change that swept Latin America at the turn of the twenty-first century. These movements have galvanized long-silenced sectors of society: indigenous people, campesinos, students, the LGBT community, the unemployed, and all those left out of the promised utopia of a globalized economy. They have deployed a wide range of strategies and actions, from building schools or clinics, to occupying factories or fields, from building and occupying political parties, to taking the reins of the state.  All in order to protect their newfound power in community.

Thursday, November 6, 2014 :3rd Annual Conference on Writing for Social Change

Featuring Dr. Robert Jensen (University of Texas, Austin)
“It’s Been a Long Time Coming:  Social Change for a Species out of Context”
10:00-11:15 AM

UVU’s annual Conference on Writing for Social Change challenges students & community members to effect positive change in the world through the power of writing.  The conference provides students and other presenters with an audience for research, writing, and other social change project presentations.  Robert Jensen, professor of media law, ethics, & politics is this years keynote speaker.

Wednesday November 19, 2014: Film Screening: Harvest of Empire: A History of Latinos in America

3:00-5:00 PM, LA 009

Thursday, January 23, 2015: Film Screening: Wrenched: The Legacy of the Monkey Wrenched Gang

3:00-5:00 PM, LA 009

January 2015: MLK Nonviolent Resistance Workshop


February 2015: Symposium on Israeli-Palestinian Conflict

Javier Martin, Hansi Escobar

Javier Martín is the Spanish international news agency EFE delegate for Israel and Palestine and member of the CEMOFPSC Advisory Committee.  Martin has spent more than a decade as a first person correspondent in Iraq.  His stories have covered the wars in Iraq and Libya, and the fall of Muamar Gadafi in 2012.  Hansi Escobar (Juan José Escobar Stemmann) is the Spanish Consul General in Jerusalem.  His most recent and popular books include The Crossroads of Muslims Brothers in Jordan and The Kingdom of Jordan’s Future Challenges.

Wednesday, February 25, 2014: Film Screening: The War Around Us

3:00-5:00 PM, LA 009

March 2015:  “Peace, Justice, and Democracy: Why They Depend On One Another”
10th Annual J. Bonner Ritchie Dialogue on Peace and Justice

Friday, March 27, 2015: Conference on Interdisciplinary Perspectives on Moral Responsibility

Moral responsibility has consistently been a salient issue in disciplines such as the law, psychology, psychiatry, and philosophy. The questions about social, cognitive, and psychological constraints on legal and moral responsibility are ever-evolving with advances in technology and knowledge. This conference seeks to address cutting-edge applied issues in moral and legal responsibility.

Wednesday, April 8, 2015: Film Screening: Poto Mitan: Haitian Women

3:00-5:00 PM, LA 009

Friday/Saturday August 14-15, 2015: “Specters of Peace in the Histories of Violence”

(Co-sponsored by History & Political Science Department, UVU, U of U & BYU
History Departments, & The Tanner Center for the Humanities, Tanner Center)
To Be Announced, Tanner Center

The “Specters of Peace in the Histories of Violence” conference brings together ten leading scholars for a two-day round-table addressing the entangled relationship between peace and violence in colonial America.  Speakers include a regional consortium of early American scholars from BYU, UVU, the University of Utah, and Utah State University. Wayne Lee, professor of History at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, and chair of the UNC Curriculum in Peace, War, and Defense will be the keynote speaker.  The conference will also convene a special “Specters of Peace” seminar for all UVU students participating.  The seminar will be facilitated by Dr. Michael Minch, John Smolenski, UC Davis, and Michael Goode.