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Humanities

 
HUM-Humanities
HUM 1010 HH
Humanities Through the Arts
3:3:0
Fall, Spring, Summer

Studies the media and compositional elements of the various art forms (literature, music, visual arts, theater, film, dance, and architecture), for greater understanding and enjoyment. Teaches how to interpret artistic meaning by analyzing artworks formally as well as in their historical contexts, such as the predominant subject matters and styles of their period. Encourages students to integrate the arts into their daily lives habitually, so that they become lifelong learners and educators.

HUM 101G HH
Humanities Through the Arts
3:3:0
Fall, Spring, Summer

Studies the media and compositional elements of the various art forms (literature, music, visual arts, theater, film, dance, and architecture), for greater understanding and enjoyment. Teaches how to interpret artistic meaning by analyzing artworks formally as well as in their historical contexts, such as the predominant subject matters and styles of their period. Encourages students to integrate the arts into their daily lives habitually, so that they become lifelong learners and educators. Places emphasis on the global, trans- and intercultural nature of human creativity and its impacts.

HUM 101H HH
Humanities Through the Arts
3:3:0
Fall, Spring

Studies the media and compositional elements of the various art forms (literature, music, visual arts, theater, film, dance, and architecture), for greater understanding and enjoyment. Teaches how to interpret artistic meaning by analyzing artworks formally as well as in their historical contexts, such as the predominant subject matters and styles of their period. Encourages students to integrate the arts into their daily lives habitually, so that they become lifelong learners and educators.

HUM 120R
Humanities Forum
3:3:0
On Sufficient Demand

Introduces students to a wide variety of aspects of the humanities. Provides enriched learning situations in which students are exposed to humanities events or noted guest scholars and other lecturers. Requires attendance of a choice of specified events on campus and off, as well as of workshop meetings with an instructor. May be repeated for a maximum of 6 credits toward graduation.

HUM 2010 HH
World History Through the Arts I
3:3:0
Fall, Spring, Summer

Studies early societies through the 1600s, as the first part of a two-part series which examines world civilizations through the arts. Explores formative creative events in history and their relationships to modern issues. Presents perspectives of traditional humanistic values of arts and ideas. Investigates how others have dealt with problems that humans faced in the past, and possible strategies for problem solving that might aid students today.

HUM 201G HH
World History Through the Arts I
3:3:0
Fall, Spring, Summer

Studies early societies through the 1600s, as the first part of a two-part series which examines world civilizations, including non-Western civilizations, through the arts. Explores formative creative events in history, and their relationships to modern issues. Presents perspectives of traditional humanistic values of arts and ideas. Investigates how others have dealt with problems that humans faced in the past, and possible strategies for problem solving that might aid students today. Promotes a trans- and intercultural, global understanding of human creativity and its impact through the ages.

HUM 201H HH
World History Through the Arts I
3:3:0
Fall, Spring

The first of a two-part series which examines world civilizations through the arts. Studies early societies through the 1600s. Explores formative creative events in history and their relationships to modern issues. Presents perspectives of traditional humanistic values of arts and ideas. Investigates how others have dealt with problems that humans faced in the past, and possible strategies for problem solving that might aid students today.

HUM 2020 HH
World History Through the Arts II
3:3:0
Fall, Spring, Summer

Studies societies from the 1600s, as the second part of a two-part series which examines world civilizations through the arts. Explores formative creative events in history and their relationships to modern issues. Presents perspectives of traditional humanistic values of arts and ideas. Investigates how others have dealt with problems that humans face in the past, and possible strategies for problem solving that might aid students today.

HUM 202G HH
World History Through the Arts II
3:3:0
Fall, Spring, Summer

Studies societies from the 1600s, including non-Western societies, as the second part of a two-part series which examines world civilizations through the arts. Explores formative creative events in history and their relationships to modern issues. Presents perspectives of traditional humanistic values of arts and ideas. Investigates how others have dealt with problems that humans face in the past, and possible strategies for problem solving that might aid students today. Promotes understanding of the global, trans- and intercultural nature of human creativity and its impacts.

HUM 202H HH
World History Through the Arts II
3:3:0
Fall, Spring

The second of a two-part series which examines world civilizations through the arts. Studies societies from the 1600's. Explores formative creative events in history and their relationships to modern issues. Presents perspectives of traditional humanitstic values of arts and ideas. Investigates how others have dealt with problems that humans face in the past, and possible strategies for problem solving that might aid students today.

HUM 203G HH
Art Form Focus I GI
3:3:0
Fall, Spring, Summer

Surveys the nature, history, and possibilities of one specific art form, such as painting, sculpture, theater, architecture, dance, music, or literature, in the context of the influence that art forms exert on each other. Deals with characteristics of a chosen art form prior to 1500 in more depth than Hum 1010 or 2010 can, while highlighting how creative events in human history always are in dialogue both with the social discourses of their times and with each other.

HUM 204G HH
Art Form Focus II GI
3:3:0
Fall, Spring, Summer

Surveys the nature, history, and possibilities of one specific art form, such as painting, sculpture, theater, architecture, dance, music, or literature, in the context of the influence that art forms exert on each other. Deals with characteristics of a chosen art form after 1500 in more depth than Hum 1010 or 2020 can, while highlighting how creative events in human history always are in dialogue both with the social discourses of their times and with each other.

HUM 2100 HH
Adventures of Ideas Through 1500
3:3:0
Fall, Spring, Summer

Studies great written or visual texts in the Western or Eastern history of ideas--artistic, literary, philosophical, religious, political, technological, or scientific--from Antiquity through1500. Readings and thematic focus vary by instructor, but all courses interrelate texts from different disciplines and world regions under one broad topic relating to the human condition, such as love, death, war and peace, family, justice, the state etc.

HUM 210H HH
Adventures of Ideas Through 1500
3:3:0
Fall, Spring
Prerequisite(s):
Enrollment in the UVU Honors program or approval by the instructor.

Studies great written or visual texts in the history of ideas--artistic, literary, philosophical, religious, political, technological, or scientific--from Antiquity through1500. Readings and thematic focus vary by instructor, but all courses interrelate texts from different disciplines and world regions under one broad topic relating to the human condition, such as love, death, war and peace, family, justice, the state etc. This Honors version of HUM 2100 requires more rigorous reading and writing assignments and is open to students in the Honors program or students with special approval from the instructor only.

HUM 2200 HH
Adventures of Ideas After 1500
3:3:0
Fall, Spring, Summer

Studies great written or visual texts in the Eastern or Western history of ideas--artistic, literary, philosophical, religious, political, technological, or scientific--from the Renaissance through the present. Readings and thematic focus vary by instructor, but all courses interrelate readings from different disciplines and world regions under one broad topic relating to the human condition, such as individuality, power, health, freedom, violence, the natural environment, etc.

HUM 220H HH
Adventures of Ideas After 1500
3:3:0
Fall, Spring
Prerequisite(s):
Enrollment in the Honors Program or instructor's approval

Studies great written and visual texts in the Eastern or Western history of ideas--artistic, literary, philosophical, religious, political, technological, or scientific--from the Renaissance through the present. Readings and thematic focus vary by instructor, but all courses interrelate readings from different disciplines and world regions under one broad topic relating to the human condition, such as individuality, power, health, freedom, violence, the natural environment, etc. This Honors version of HUM 2200 requires more rigorous reading and writing assignments and is open to students in the Honors program or students with special approval from the instructor only.

HUM 2500
Introduction to Ancient Greek I
6:6:0
Fall, Spring
Prerequisite(s):
ENGL 1010

Allows students the opportunity to intensively study the Ancient Greek language at the introductory level. Focuses primarily on Attic Greek. Focuses primarily on grammer and textbook exercises with some analysis of literary and/or philosophical selections in Ancient Greek. Relates particularly to students interested in studying Ancient Greek philosophy or Ancient Greek literature, and offers an important grounding for students interested in studying the New Testament.

HUM 2510
Introduction to Ancient Greek II
6:6:0
Fall, Spring
Prerequisite(s):
HUM 2500

Allows students to continue intensive study of the Ancient Greek language at the introductory level. Focuses primarily on Attic Greek. Focuses primarily on grammer and textbook exercises with some analysis of literary and/or philosophical selections in Ancient Greek. Relates particularly to students interested in studying Ancient Greek philosophy or Ancient Greek literature and an important grounding for students interested in studying the New Testament.

HUM 281R
Internship
1 to 6:0:5 to 30
Fall, Spring, Summer
Prerequisite(s):
Approval of Cooperative Coordinator
Prerequisite(s) or Corequisite(s):
Completion of at least nine credits of class work in Humanities.

Allows pre-advanced Humanities students to receive credit for Humanities-related service as a paid or unpaid intern in a governmental, not-for-profit, or private agency. Provides practical and research development in the selected areas of service so as to further students' academic and professional interests and goals. Internship must be supervised by agency representative. Must be approved by Humanities internship advisor and department chair and written contracts must be completed and signed. Credit is determined by the number of hours a student works during the semester. May be repeated for a maximum of 9 credits toward graduation. May be graded credit/no credit.

HUM 290R
Independent Study
1 to 3:0 to 3:0 to 12
Fall, Spring, Summer

Provides independent study as directed in reading and individual projects. Request must be submitted for approval by the department. Students may do independent study for one, two or three credits with a limit of three credits applying toward graduation with an AA/AS degree.

HUM 295R
Directed Readings
1 to 3:0 to 3:0 to 12
Fall, Spring, Summer

Provides an opportunity for second year students to do in-depth research within the Humanities. Study is limited to advanced work beyond that which can be completed in existing, available classes. A proposal must be submitted and approved by the department prior to enrollment.

HUM 3060  (Cross-listed with: ENGL 3060)
Visual Rhetoric
3:3:0
Fall, Spring
Prerequisite(s):
(ENGL 2010 or ENGL 2020) and University Advanced Standing

Investigates the growing academic and cultural interest in the rhetorical nature of visual texts. Teaches critical thinking about the consumption and productions of images and multimodal texts. Explores visual grammars and other theories of visual rhetoric as articulated by contemporary image, language, and rhetoric scholars. Encourages the development of theoretical and practical knowledge through reading, discussion and analysis as well as through the production of visual texts and written work.

HUM 320R
Topics in Humanities
1 to 3:1 to 3:0
Fall, Spring
Prerequisite(s):
(ENGL 2010 or ENGL 2020 or at least sophomore status) and University Advanced Standing

Studies varying topics such as a theme (e.g., death or story-telling), figure (e.g., John Cage or Michelangelo), or movement (e.g., DaDa or Pragmatism) in humanities. Involves study of more than one art form (e.g., film, literature, and music) or discipline (e.g., art, history, and biology). May be repeated for a maximum of 6 credits toward graduation with different topics.

HUM 325R
Area Studies in Humanities
3:3:0
Fall
Prerequisite(s):
(ENGL 2010 or ENGL 2020 or at least sophomore status) and University Advanced Standing

Studies the literature, philosophy, and arts of a particular geographical area. Topics vary. May be repeated for a maximum of 6 credits toward graduation with different topics.

HUM 330R
Period Studies in Humanities
3:3:0
On Sufficient Demand
Prerequisite(s):
(ENGL 2010 or ENGL 2020 or at least sophomore status) and University Advanced Standing

Studies a particular period within the humanities (such as the medieval world, Romanticism, or Modernism). Involves study of more than one art form (e.g., music, art, and literature) or discipline (such as literature and philosophy) from during the chosen period. Topics vary. Repeatable, with different topics, toward graduation.

HUM 3500
Approaches to Humanities
3:3:0
Fall
Prerequisite(s):
(HUM 1010 or higher) and (ENGL 2010 or ENGL 2020) and University Advanced Standing

Surveys recent critical and aesthetic theory for each art form and teaches students how to apply theoretical approaches to the interpretation of individual texts, films, artworks, buildings, performances, etc. Includes readings of seminal works by philosophers, academic or professional critics, and practicing artists. May also study examples where the apparent divide between theory and practice is collapsed, where, for instance, an artistic product in itself may have provided a new approach for future artistic productivity and interpretation, or where a theoretical contribution has been made in such a way as immediately to demonstrate a certain creative practice.

HUM 3800  (Cross-listed with: PHIL 3800)
Aesthetics
3:3:0
Fall
Prerequisite(s):
(PHIL 2050 or PHIL 205H or PHIL 205G) and (HUM 1010 or HUM 101G or HUM 101H) and University Advanced Standing

Studies aesthetics as perceived by the disciplines of philosophy, psychology, sociology, anthropology, history, and others. Analyzes art forms, including the visual arts, literature, music, and theater from the perspective of philosophers such as Plato, Aristotle, Kant, Hume, Dewey, Danto, Bell, Collingwood, Thoreau, and Dickie.

HUM 3820  (Cross-listed with: PHIL 3820)
Philosophy Through Literature
3:3:0
On Sufficient Demand
Prerequisite(s):
(PHIL 1000 or PHIL 100H or PHIL 2050 or PHIL 205H or PHIL 205G or PHIL 2110 or PHIL 2150 or instructor approval) and University Advanced Standing

Provides students with an interdisciplinary approach to the study of philosophy through literature. Gives students the opportunity to read some of the most engaging thinkers and how they offer differing perspectives through a variety of texts. Breaks down some of the strict divisions placed between philosophical and literary texts.

HUM 400R
Humanism and Posthumanism
3:3:0
On Sufficient Demand
Prerequisite(s):
At least junior standing and University Advanced Standing
Prerequisite(s) or Corequisite(s):
ENG 2010 or ENGL 2020

Explores Humanism or Posthumanism across the arts and their diverse cultural history. Defines humanism as varieties of the traditional view that Man is the measure of all things, and Posthumanism as an umbrella term for recent theoretical approaches within the humanities that challenge this view, for instance by placing humanity in the context of global or universal, intrinsically diverse and self-generating, scientific, technological, or ecological systems. May compare aspects of humanism throughout space and time, in its diverse cultural manifestations, or may focus on a twenty-first-century view of these long traditions. May also choose the example of the humanistic or posthumanistic aspects of a single time period, culture, or interdisciplinary oeuvre. Offers an opportunity to advanced students to synthesize, critique, and strengthen their own viewpoints, and to expand their interdisciplinary understanding of human expression, in response to the most fundamental or recent currents within intellectual history. May be repeated for a maximum of 6 credits toward graduation.

HUM 401R
Forms and Genres Across the Arts
3:3:0
On Sufficient Demand
Prerequisite(s):
At least junior standing and University Advanced Standing
Prerequisite(s) or Corequisite(s):
ENGL 2010 or ENGL 2020

Explores forms and genres of imagery, narrative, drama, composition, or performance, across all art forms. Fosters analytical and interpretative skills in reading all kinds of texts. Highlights the inextricable interrelations among all realms of sensual, intellectual, aesthetic, and cultural experience. Illuminates the polar dynamics of tradition and innovation, continuity and change, and departure and return throughout the history of human creativity. May be repeated for a maximum of 6 credits toward graduation.

HUM 414R
Advanced Topics in Humanities
3:3:0
On Sufficient Demand
Prerequisite(s):
At least junior standing and University Advanced Standing
Prerequisite(s) or Corequisite(s):
ENGL 2010 or ENGL 2020

Studies a topic relevant to cross-disciplinary humanities at an advanced level of critical engagement. Involves more than one art form or discipline of humanistic inquiry. Requires study of secondary literature and theoretical texts. May be repeated, with different topics, for a maximum of 6 credits toward graduation.

HUM 4300  (Cross-listed with: PHIL 4300)
Environmental Aesthetics
3:3:0
Spring
Prerequisite(s):
(PHIL 000, PHIL 100H, PHIL 2050, PHIL 205H, PHIL 205G, ENST 3000, HUM 1010, HUM 101H, HUM 101G, or HUM 3500) and University Advanced Standing

Introduces students to emerging themes in environmental aesthetics. Evaluates concepts and attitudes toward nature including, but not limited to, the concept of beauty in natural and human-made environments from a cross-cultural perspective. Studies environmental formalism, cognitivism and non-cognitivism, as well as divergent spiritual, ecological, religious, and moral approaches to the appreciation of nature.

HUM 481R
Internship
1 to 6:0:5 to 30
Prerequisite(s):
Departmental chair approval and University Advanced Standing

Allows advanced Humanities students to receive credit for Humanities-related service as a paid or unpaid intern in a governmental, not-for-profit, or private agency. Provides practical and research development in the selected areas of service so as to further students' academic or professional interests or goals. Internship must be supervised by agency representative. Must be approved by Humanities internship advisor and department chair and written contracts must be completed and signed. Credit is determined by the number of hours a student works during the semester. May be repeated for a maximum of 9 credits toward graduation. May be graded credit/no credit.

HUM 490R
Directed Readings
1 to 3:1 to 3:0
Fall, Spring
Prerequisite(s):
Department Chair Approval, Instructor Approval, and University Advanced Standing

Designs reading and writing assignments in consultation with a faculty member to meet special needs or interests not available through regular course work. May be repeated for a maximum of 6 credits toward graduation.

HUM 4910
Humanities Capstone
3:3:0
Prerequisite(s):
Senior Standing and University Advanced Standing
Prerequisite(s) or Corequisite(s):
HUM 3500

To be taken during the students' last semester in the baccalaureate program. Instructs them how to conduct Humanities research, develop a complex critical argument, and write a senior thesis, building on skills and knowledge gained in earlier courses. Encourages students to explore their desired professional or graduate research interests. Includes defending the paper's thesis, method, and conclusion before a faculty committee, as well as the creation of a portfolio helpful in applying to graduate school or seeking employment.