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Communication - Journalism Emphasis, B.S.

Requirements

Students choosing a Communication degree with an emphasis in Journalism will have the opportunity to work with award-winning faculty and gain substantial amounts of hands-on experience. The program encourages students to get involved with The UVU Review, the student-produced campus news organization. The Review is an excellent way to build skills in print, broadcast, and web journalism.  Course options for Journalism students range from introductory writing and reporting classes to advanced magazine writing, news editing, broadcast news, and long format video journalism. Students interested in a degree in Communication with an emphasis in Journalism should look at degree requirements and start planning for future semesters. Journalism students are encouraged to look into elective credits in the Digital Media Department, as a way to broaden their skills in modern storytelling.

Total Program Credits: 120

General Education Requirements: 35 Credits
  ENGL 1010 Introduction to Writing 3
  ENGL 2010 Intermediate Writing--Humanities/Social Sciences (3.0)  
or ENGL 2020 Intermediate Writing--Science and Technology 3
  MATH 1040 Introduction to Statistics (recommended for Social Science majors) 3
Complete one of the following: 3
  HIST 1700 American Civilization (3.0)  
  HIST 2700 US History to 1877 (3.0)  
and HIST 2710 US History since 1877 (3.0)  
  HIST 1740 US Economic History (3.0)  
  POLS 1000 American Heritage (3.0)  
  POLS 1100 American National Government (3.0)  
Complete the following:  
  PHIL 2050 Ethics and Values 3
  HLTH 1100 Personal Health and Wellness (2.0)  
or PES 1097 Fitness for Life 2
Distribution Courses:  
  Biology 3
  Physical Science 3
  Additional Biology or Physical Science 3
  Humanities 3
  Fine Arts 3
  COMM 2110 Interpersonal Communication (fulfills Social/Behavioral Science) 3
Discipline Core Requirements: 27 Credits
  COMM 1000 Exploring the Communication Major (Must pass with a C- or better) 3
  COMM 2300 Public Relations 3
  COMM 3020 Communication Research Methods 3
  COMM 3050 Theories of Communication and Culture 3
  COMM 350R Special Topics in Communication 3
  COMM 4930 Communication Capstone 3
Choose one of the following two courses: 3
  COMM 1020 Public Speaking (3.0)  
  COMM 1130 Writing for the Mass Media (3.0)  
Choose one of the following two courses: 3
  COMM 1050 Introduction to Speech Communication (3.0)  
  COMM 1500 Introduction to Mass Communication (3.0)  
Choose one of the following two courses: 3
  COMM 3000 Media Ethics (3.0)  
  COMM 3700 Free Expression in a Democratic Society (3.0)  
Elective Requirements: 13 Credits
  Complete 13 credits of electives 1000 level or higher 13
Emphasis Requirements: 18 Credits
  COMM 1610 Reporting for the Mass Media 3
  COMM 3100  Propaganda and Persuasion 3
Complete 6 credits from the following Media and Practice courses: 6
  COMM 2790 Magazine Writing (3.0)  
  COMM 2100 The News Editing Process (3.0)  
  COMM 2560 Radio Production (3.0)  
  COMM 2250 Principles of Advertising (3.0)  
  DGM 2110 Digital Motion Picture Essentials (3.0)  
  DGM 2120 Web Essentials (3.0)  
Complete 6 credits from the following Applied Theory and Research courses: 6
  COMM 3150  Film Theory (3.0)  
  COMM 362G International Communication (3.0)  
  COMM 3660 Investigative Reporting (3.0)  
  COMM 3780 Mormon Cultural Studies (3.0)  
  COMM 3790 Case Studies in Journalism (3.0)  
Emphasis Elective Requirements: 27 Credits
Complete 6 credits from the following: 6
  COMM 3000 Media Ethics (3.0)  
  COMM 3130 The Culture of Nature and Technology (3.0)  
  COMM 3150 Film Theory (3.0)  
  COMM 319G Intercultural Communication Encounters (3.0)  
  COMM 332G Cross-Cultural Communications for International Business (3.0)  
  COMM 3410 Fundamentals of Mediation and Negotiation (3.0)  
  COMM 350R Special Topics in Communication (3.0)  
  COMM 3520 Public Relations Case Studies (3.0)  
  COMM 3530 Public Relations Writing (3.0)  
  COMM 3600 Mass Media Ethics and Law (3.0)  
  COMM 3660 Investigative Reporting (3.0)  
  COMM 3680 Advertising Media Planning (3.0)  
  COMM 3700 Free Expression in a Democratic Society (3.0)  
  COMM 3780 Mormon Cultural Studies (3.0)  
  Complete 21 credits of non-COMM courses (10 credits must be upper division). A MINOR in another discipline is highly recommended. 21

  Graduation Requirements:

  1. Completion of a minimum of 120 or more semester credits.
  2. Overall grade point average of 2.0 (C) or above (departments may require a higher GPA).
  3. Residency hours: minimum of 30 credit hours through course attendance at UVU, with at least 10 hours earned in the last 45 hours.
  4. Completion of GE and specified departmental requirements.
  5. Completion of COMM courses with a C- or higher.
  6. Successful completion of at least one Global/Intercultural course.

Graduation Plan

This graduation plan is intended to be a guide. You are encouraged to meet with an advisor and set up an individualized graduation plan in Wolverine Track.

Semester 1 Course Title Credit Hours
ENGL 1010 Introduction to Writing 3
American Institutions 3
Biology Distribution 3
HLTH 1100 or PE 1097 Personal Health and Wellness or Fitness for Life 2
COMM 1000 Exploring the Communication Major (Must pass with a C- or higher) 3
  Semester total: 14
Notes: American Institutions: HIST 1700, HIST 2700 and 2710, HIST 1740, POL 1000, POLS 1100
Semester 2 Course Title Credit Hours
ENGL 2010 or 2020 Intermediate Writing —Hum/SS or Intermediate Writing—Sci and Tech 3
MATH 1040 Introduction to Statistics 3
PHIL 2050 Ethics and Values 3
Fine Arts Distribution 3
COMM 1130 Writing for the Mass Media 3
  Semester total: 15
Semester 3 Course Title Credit Hours
Physical Science Distribution 3
Additional Biology or Physical Science Distribution 3
3 credits of electives 1000 level or higher  3
Non-Communication Electives 3
COMM 1500 Intro to Mass Comm 3
  Semester total: 15
Notes: 10 of 21 required Non-Communication Elective credits must be upper division;  A MINOR in another discipline is highly recommended).
Semester 4 Course Title Credit Hours
4 credits of electives 1000 level or higher 4
Non-Communication Electives 6
COMM 1610 Reporting for the Mass Media 3
COMM 2110 Interpersonal Communication (fulfills Social/Behavioral Science Distribution) 3
  Semester total: 16
Notes:  10 of 21 required Non-Communication Elective credits must be upper division;  A MINOR in another discipline is highly recommended).
Semester 5 Course Title Credit Hours
3 credits of electives 1000 level or higher 3
Non-Communication Electives 6
COMM 2300 Public Relations 3
COMM 3000 or 3700 Media Ethics or Free Expression in a Democratic Society 3
  Semester total: 15
Notes:  10 of 21 required Non-Communication Elective credits must be upper division; A MINOR in another discipline is highly recommended).
Semester 6 Course Title Credit Hours
Non-Communication Electives 3
Humanities Distribution 3
3 credits of electives 1000 level or higher 3
COMM 3020 Communication Research Methods 3
COM 350R Special Topics in Communication 3
  Semester total: 15
Notes:  10 of 21 required Non-Communication Elective credits must be upper division; A MINOR in another discipline is highly recommended).
Semester 7 Course Title Credit Hours
Non-Communication Electives 3
Media and Practice Course 3
Applied Theory and Research course 3
Emphasis Elective course 3
COMM 3050 Theories of Communication and Culture 3
  Semester total: 15
Notes: Media and Practice courses: COMM 2790, COMM 2100, COMM 2560, COMM 2250, DGM 2110, DGM 2120; Applied Theory and Research courses: COMM 3150, COMM 362G, COMM 3660, COMM 3780, COMM 3790; Emphasis Elective courses: COMM 3000, COMM 3130, COMM 3150, COMM 319G, COMM 332G, COMM 3410, COMM 350R, COMM 3520, COMM 3530, COMM 3600, COMM 3660, COMM 3680, COMM 3700, COMM 3780. 10 of 21 required Non-Communication Elective credits must be upper division; A MINOR in another discipline is highly recommended).
Semester 8 Course Title Credit Hours
Media and Practice Course 3
Applied Theory and Research course 3
Emphasis Elective course 3
COMM 3100 Propaganda and Persuasion 3
COMM 4930 Communication Capstone 3
  Semester total: 15
Notes: Media and Practice courses: COMM 2790, COMM 2100, COMM 2560, COMM 2250, DGM 2110, DGM 2120; Applied Theory and Research courses: COMM 3150, COMM 362G, COMM 3660, COMM 3780, COMM 3790; Emphasis Elective courses: COMM 3000, COMM 3130, COMM 3150, COMM 319G, COMM 332G, COMM 3410, COMM 350R, COMM 3520, COMM 3530, COMM 3600, COMM 3660, COMM 3680, COMM 3700, COMM 3780. Graduation Requirements: 1) Completion of a minimum of 120  or more semester credits. 2) Overall grade point average of 2.0 (C) or above. 3) Residency hours: minimum of 30 credit hours through course attendance at UVU, with at least 10 hours earned in the last 45 hours. 4) Completion of GE and specified departmental requirements. 5) Completion of 16 credit hours of course work from one language to include the 1010, 1020, 2010, and 202G/2020 levels or transferred equivalents for BA or 13 credits of 1000 level or higer for a BS. 6) Completion of COMM courses with a C- or higher. 7) Successful completion of at least one Global/Intercultural course.
  Degree total: 120

Department

 Name:

 Communication

 Location:

 LC 227

 Telephone:

 801-863-8452

 Email:

  courtney.burns@uvu.edu

 Web Address:

 uvu.edu/comm

 Chair:

 Janet Colvin

 

 
 

Mission Statement

The mission of the Department of Communication is to prepare students to execute critical thinking skills and to help students prepare for careers that require expertise in oral, written, and/or mediated communications. The department offers programs of study leading to Associate in Arts/Science and Bachelor of Arts/Science degrees with concentrations in Journalism, Public Relations, or Speech Communication. Communication is also available as an emphasis for a BA or BS in Integrated Studies as a minor.

Programs of study in Communication at UVU offer a balance of analytic and applied approaches to study in the field. The department offers an expanding menu of beginning and advanced courses in mass communication, public relations, media studies, interpersonal communication, intercultural communication, international
communication, organizational communication, and journalism.

Encouraging student internships, and working closely with Student Media and other units on campus, the curriculum balances traditional, academic-style learning with applied, practical approaches to study in the field.

 
 

Journalism


Notes:

  1. Please contact Courtney Burns at 801-863-8452 to make an appointment to meet with Gae Robinson.
  2. Communication students in the journalism emphasis are required to have laptop computers.
 
 

Public Relations


Notes: Please contact Courtney Burns at 801-863-8452 to make an appointment to meet with Natalie Shelley.

 
 

Speech Communication


Notes: Please contact Courtney Burns at 801-863-8452 to make an appointment to meet with Gae Robinson.

 
 

Faculty

Maria Blevins(2013)

Assistant Professor

Department: Communication
Faculty



B.S. Recreation Management, University of Maine at Machias, M.A.; Organizational Communications, University of Montana; Ph.D., Speech Communication, University of Utah.

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Janet Colvin(2007)

Associate Professor

Department: Communication
Department Chair, Faculty



B.A., Public Relations, Brigham Young University; M.A., Instructional Technology, Ph.D., Speech Communication, University of Utah.

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James Fisher(2014)

Lecturer

Department: Communication
Faculty



B.S., University Studies, University of New Mexico; M.A., Journalism, University of Missouri-Columbia.

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Philip Gordon(1999)

Associate Professor

Department: Communication
Faculty

Department: Interdisciplinary Studies Program
Coordinator, American Studies

B.A., M.A., Ph.D., Speech Communications, University of Illinois.

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Jingdong Liang(2002)

Associate Professor

Department: Communication
Faculty



B.A., English, People’s University of China; M.A., Journalism, Graduate School of Chinese Academy of Social Sciences; Ph.D., Communications, University of Utah.

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Hank McIntire(2014)

Lecturer

Department: Communication
Faculty



B.A., Spanish Translation, B.S. Travel and Tourism, Brigham Young University; M.A., Communication, University of Utah.

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David Morin(2013)

Assistant Professor

Department: Communication
Faculty



B.A., Political Science, University of Illinois; M.A., Communication, Virginia Polytechnic Institute; Ph.D., Media & Communication, Bowling Green State University.

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Spencer Patterson(2014)

Assistant Professor

Department: Communication
Faculty



B.S., University Studies, Brigham Young University; M.A., Organizational Communications, Idaho State University; Ph.D., Health Communication, Ohio University.

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Farah Sanders(2009)

Lecturer

Department: Communication
Faculty



B.S., Integrated Studies, Utah Valley University, M.Ed., Education, Southern Utah University.

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David Scott(2008)

Associate Professor

Department: Communication
Faculty



B.S., Political Science, B.S., Speech Communication, University of Utah; M.A., Communications, Brigham Young University; Ph.D., Mass Communication, University of Georgia.

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Nancy Tobler(2009)

Assistant Professor

Department: Communication
Faculty



B.S., Speech/English Teaching, M.S., Communication, Interpersonal/Organizational, Utah State University; Ph.D., Communication, Organizational, University of Utah.

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Stephen Whyte(2010)

Assistant Professor

Department: Communication
Faculty



B.A., Political Science, M.P.A., Public Administration, Brigham Young University.

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Careers

Careers:  
Virtually every modern field of endeavor has increasing demand for specialists with training in the field of communication. Traditional areas of employment for communication students include: print and electronic journalism; print and electronic entertainment; public relations (public affairs, media relations, customer relations, marketing, etc.); advertising; various sorts of writing, reviewing, and editing; training; sales; project management; and management. Today, new media technologies are expanding the need for communication specialists, as well as their range of skills. Communication also provides excellent preparation for graduate study in the fields of business, education, law, psychology, and of course, communication.
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