2018 Environmental Ethics Symposium



Twenty-Ninth Annual 
David R. Keller
Environmental Ethics Symposium

The Ethics of Utah
Lake Conservation

Thursday, March 8th, 2018

10:00 a.m. - 4:00 p.m.
UVU Library Lecture Hall (FL-120)

As the largest freshwater lake wholly in the state, Utah Lake should serve as a major recreational resource.  The lake holds great potential for swimming, sailing, fishing, and other outdoor pursuits.  The popularity of the lake for these uses, however, is limited by a host of environmental concerns, including pollution and invasive species. This conference will explore these environmental challenges of Utah Lake, and how those challenges limit the lake’s full potential as a resource and as an ecosystem. will explore these environmental challenges of Utah Lake, and how those challenges limit the lake’s full potential as a resource and as an ecosystem.  


Session One - Keynote
10:00 - 11:15 a.m.

D. Robert Carter, 
Utah Historian and Author

D. Robert Carter has been documenting the history of Provo since his retirement from teaching in the Alpine School District and is a former columnist in history for the Daily Herald. His recent publications include Conflict and Change: Provo, Utah 1857-1859From Fort to Village: Provo, Utah 1850-1854, and Founding Fort Utah: Provo’s Native Inhabitants, Early Explorers, and First Year of Settlements.


Session Two
11:30 - 12:45 p.m. 

Weihong Wang, 
Assistant Professor of Geography, Utah Valley University

Dr. Weihong Wang has conducted numerous scientific studies in the local Utah area, with projects ranging from the monitoring of trace metals in Utah Lake to investigating the impact of the Gold King Mine Spill of 2015. Dr. Wang’s research at Utah Valley University includes Carbon Dynamics in Wetland Ecosystems, Climate Change, and Sustainability, and her scholastic projects include “Assessing Geothermal Potential in Utah (USA) and its Impact on the Economy and Environment Using GIS Mapping.”


Session Three
1:00 - 2:15 p.m. 

Jaimi Butler, Coordinator for the Greater Salt Lake Institute

Jaimi Butler has over a decade of experience focused on the Great Salt Lake, from brine shrimp harvesting to working with the Utah Division of Wildlife Resources Great Salt Lake Ecosystem Project. Her current work involves assisting in a variety of faculty research projects, and co-authored Worth Your Salt: Halophiles in Education.


Session Four
2:30 - 3:45 p.m. 

Student Panel



2018 EES Utah Lake Sidebar