David Keller 

In Memoriam: Dr. David Richard Keller
 
"Instructions for Live Streaming the Keller Symposium 3-5-14

Follow this link:
https://new.livestream.com/accounts/7442872/events/2817050

EITHER login with Facebook, create a livestream account, or use the following to log in (3 options, choose one)
username: Kellersymposium@outlook.com
password: goodmorning

once you login, click on the live feed on the page.


Our beloved friend and colleague David Keller passed away on December 28th after fourteen years as Director of the Center for the Study of Ethics. David's generosity and passion for learning were felt by the many students and colleagues who were affected by his extraordinary life. His pioneering work in environmental studies will leave a lasting impact on this emering field. David was a national leader in the Ethics Across the Curriculum movement. He served on the Board of Directors for the Society for Ethics Across the Curriculum and as editor of the organization's journal, Teaching Ethics. As a public intellectual, David served an important role in facilitating community dialogue on a range of issues including academic freedom, political engagement, educational policy, and environmental stewardship. Along with a good book, spending time in the Utah outdoors with his wife Anina was among David's favorite pastimes. Though he will be sorely missed, his legacy will continue through the affection and devotion of his UVU colleagues. Read Obituary. 
 
 
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Spring 2014 Schedule of Events:

As of January 1, 2014

ETHICS FORUMS ARE FREE AND OPEN TO THE PUBLIC

Spring 2014 Event Schedule PDF

Check back for the Fall 2014 program of events

January 6 - David Keller Memorial

In Memorium: Dr. David Richard Keller

Our beloved friend and colleague David Keller passed away on December 28th after fourteen years as Director of the Center for the Study of Ethics. David's generosity and passion for learning were felt by the many students and colleagues who were affected by his extraordinary life. His pioneering work in environmental studies will leave a lasting impact on this emering field. David was a national leader in the Ethics Across the Curriculum movement. He served on the Board of Directors for the Society for Ethics Across the Curriculum and as editor of the organization's journal, Teaching Ethics. As a public intellectual, David served an important role in facilitating community dialogue on a range of issues including academic freedom, political engagement, educational policy, and environmental stewardship. Along with a good book, spending time in the Utah outdoors with his wife Anina was among David's favorite pastimes. Though he will be sorely missed, his legacy will continue through the affection and devotion of his UVU colleagues. Read Obituary.

Salt Lake Tribune Article.

11:00 - 1:00 p.m. Center for the Study of Ethics
(Organized by Shannon Mussett, Department Chair, Philosophy and Humanities Department)

January 22-23 - Conference by the Faculty

During the third week of January, the Conference by the Faculty provides a forum for UVU faculty to present papers and lead discussion with regard to interdisciplinary ethics, pedagogy, or public policy.

The theme is OPEN.

Presentations are relatively short--12 to 15 minutes--and therefore are a synopsis of a larger scholarship project outlined in a peer-reviewed conference paper or journal article in the faculty's discipline.

January 22 - Conference by the Faculty

15th Annual Conference by the Faculty

(Organized by Kim Bartholomew, Associate Director, Center for the Study of Ethics)

Session One: Educational Strategies
Moderator: Kimberly Bartholomew
10:00 a.m.–10:50 a.m., Library Auditorium (LI 120)

Jonathan Westover: Effectively Combining Traditional Learning and e-Learning Pedagogies Across Disciplines: Ethical Considerations and Student Success Outcomes

Jeff Cold: Flipped Classroom 101

Session Two: National and International Policy
Moderator: Thi Nguyen
11:00-11:50 a.m., Library Auditorium (LI 120)

Lynn England: Ethical Dilemmas for International Development

Alex Simon and Steven Clark: Ballot Measures and Democracy

Session Three: Contemporary Issues in Philosophy
Moderator: Wayne Hanewicz
12:00 – 12:50 p.m., Library Auditorium (LI 120)

Shannon Mussett: Deployments of Sexual Violence

Chris Weigel: The Ethics of Everyday Confabulation

Session Four: Religious Studies
Moderator:
1:00-1:50 p.m., Library Auditorium (LI 120)

Dennis Potter: Mormonism and Heterodoxy

Brian Birch: Mormonism, Race, and Religious Authority

Session Five: Ethics and Human Nature
Moderator:
2:00-2:50 p.m., Library Auditorium (LI 120)

Keith Snedegar: Memorials

Wayne Hanewicz: How Shall We Replace Ourselves?

Session Six: Philosophy and Ethics
Moderator:
3:00- 3:50 p.m., Library Auditorium (LI 120)

Phil Gordon: Conspiracy Theory Theory Theory:

A Call for a Serious Discussion about Ridiculous Ideas

Thi Nguyen: Ethical Uncertainty and Tolerance

January 23 - Conference by the Faculty

15th Annual Conference by the Faculty

(Organized by Kim Bartholomew, Associate Director, Center for the Study of Ethics)

Session Seven: Computer Technology, Privacy and Policy
Moderator: Wayne Hanewicz
10:00 a.m. – 11:15 a.m.

Anne Arendt and Cheryl Hanewicz: Surveillance, Privacy, and Societal Indifference

John Fisher: Media Policies in the Emergency Services

Session Eight: University Issues
Moderator: John Fisher
11:30 a.m.-12:45 p.m., Library Auditorium (LI 120)

Ben Johnson: Critical Period for Endowment Building at a Public University: A Case Study from the Twentieth Century

David Knowlton: The IRB and the University

Session Nine: Literary Readings
Moderator:
1:00-2:15 p.m., Library Auditorium (LI 120)

Larry Harper: Sentences & Stories

Session Ten: Ethical Responsibility and Evolution
Moderator:
2:30 p.m.-3:45 p.m., Library Auditorium (LI 120)

Ruhul Kuddus: Organic Evolution and the Darwin Wallace Controversy

Mark Olsen: Personality Disorders and Responsibility

Session Eleven: Healthcare and Equity
Moderator: Pierre Lamarche
4:00 p.m.-5:15 p.m., Library Auditorium (LI 120)

Kim Bartholomew: Digital Divide and Patient Portals

Sheldon Smith: Traditional Health Insurance and High-Deductible Health Plans: Tax and Public Policy Implications

Paul Morrey: Guiding undergraduate researchers: Proposing the addition of National Drug Codes to the MalaCards Integrated Database

February 4 - Ethics Forum for Faculty Research

Ethics Forum for Faculty Research:

"CANCELLED"

March 4 - Ethics Forum for Faculty Research

Ethics Forum for Faculty Research

"Cuban Democratic Institutions"
Lynn England, Lecturer, History and Political Science

Introduction: Kimberly Bartholomew, Associate Director, Center for the Study of Ethics

4 - 5:15 p.m. Library Auditorium (LI120)

Professor England will be discussing the changes now occurring in Cuba and the Cuban view of their society.

In the United States, the Cuban government is commonly viewed as the epitome of totalitarian dictatorships: two brothers, Fidel and Raul Castro, have ruled the island successively since 1959. The government is ruled by a one-party system that has allowed almost no open dissent and elections, if held, are viewed as rigged. However, Cuban political scientists and the government argue that it is the United States political system that is ultimately anti-democratic. The loyalty of political leaders is to their party and their corporate donors, not to the individual citizens. They argue that Cuba has created a grass-roots based democratic system where the people, through their neighborhood committees, elect citizens with no allegiances, except to their neighbors and Cuba. Their institutions create model democracy. We will discuss the Cuban systems and claims about its successes and failures.

Readings and Resources can be found on Ethics Forum Lecture Series

March 5 - David Keller Symposium

The Center for the Study of Ethics, College of Humanities, and the Philosophy and Humanities Department are pleased to present the David Keller Symposium. This single-day event will be from 8-5:15 p.m. in the Timpanogos room. 

(Organized by Shannon Mussett, Department Chair, Philosophy and Humanities Department, Utah Valley University)

Timpanogos Room

Breakfast and Opening Remarks
Shannon Mussett, Utah Valley University
8 -8:25 a.m.

"David Keller: Ethics in Many Seasons"
Elaine Englehardt, Utah Valley University
8:30 - 8:55 a.m.

"American Exceptionalism/Human Exceptionalism: What these Tow Dogmas Can Teach Us About Justice"
Deen Chatterjee, University of Utah
9 -9:50 a.m.

"David Keller as Student, Teacher, and Scholar"
John Granrose, University of Georgia
10 -10:50 a.m.

"Global Democracy: A Preliminary and Minimal Proposal"
Michael Minch, Utah Valley University
11 -11:55 a.m.

"The Soul's Longing for God: Erotic Language as a Solution to Ineffability"
Rick McDonald, Utah Valley University
11:30 -11:55 a.m.

Lakeview Room

Lunch and Eulogies

"Seven Pages from The Book of Sharks"
Rob Carney, Utah Valley University

Eulogies:

Ian Wilson, Utah Valley University
Brian Birch, Utah Valley University
Scott Abbott, Utah Valley University
Leslie Simon, Utah Valley University
Jill Jasperson, Utah Valley University
Larry Harper, Utah Valley University
Matt Holland, Utah Valley University
David Yells, Utah Valley University
Keith Snedegar, Utah Valley University
Allen Hill, Utah Valley University
Luke Peterson, Utah Valley University

"Ripple"
Chris Foster, Ashford University

Timpanogos Room

"David's Heirs: The Enduring Books Authored by Professor David Keller"
Ruhul Kuddus, Utah Valley University
2 - 2:25 p.m.

"Leopold, Callicott, and the Ethics of Wolf Killing"
Alex Simon, Utah Valley University
2:30 - 2:55 p.m.

"David Keller's Introduction to Ethics for Teaching."
Michael Pritchard, Western Michigan University
3 -3:50 p.m.

"How Much Suffering is Enough, For One Man, or One Species?"
David Rothenberg, New Jersey Institute of Technology
4 -5 p.m.

Closing Remarks
Shannon Mussett, Utah Valley University

David Keller Memorial PDF

March 20 - Kirk Englehardt Business Ethics Award & Address

Executive Lecture Series

Tenth Annual Kirk Englehardt Business Ethics Award & Address

2014 Award Recipient: Mary Crafts-Homer, CEO and President, Culinary Crafts

Introduction: Elaine E. Englehardt, Distinguished Professor of Ethics

Award Presentation: Norman Wright, Dean, Woodbury School of Business

11:30 a.m. – 12:20 p.m., Regan Theater

April 1 - Ethics Forum for Faculty Research

Ethics Forum for Faculty Research

"Professional Codes of Ethics, Certification and Licensing of Computer Technology Professionals"
Moderator: Chuck Allison, Computer Science Chair

Panelists:
Robert Jorgensen, Information Systems &Technology Department
Kim Bartholomew, Information Systems &Technology Department
Arlen Card, Digital Media Department
Keith Olsen, Computer Science Department

4 - 5:15 p.m. Library Auditorium (LI120)

Introduction: Kim Bartholomew, Associate Director, Center for the Study of Ethics

April 3 - Environmental Ethics Symposium

Twenty-Fifth Annual Environmental Ethics Symposium

"The Changing Environment of China"

(Organized by Samuel Y. Liang, Assistant Professor of Humanities and the Coordinator of Chinese Studies, Utah Valley University)

Opening Remarks:

David Yells, Dean, CHSS, Utah Valley University
Brian Birch, Associate Vice President of Academic Affairs, Utah Valley University
Introduction: Samuel Y. Liang, Assistant Professor of Humanities and the Coordinator of Chinese Studies, Utah Valley University
10 - 10:15 a.m., Library Auditorium (LI120)

Economic Growth and Environment:

"Peak Oil and the Limits to China's Economic Growth"
Minqi Li, Associate Professor of Economics, University of Utah

"China at Crossroads: Balancing the Economy and Environment"
Weihong Wang, Assistant Professor, Department of Earth Sciences, Utah Valley University
10:15 - 11:15 a.m., Library Auditorium (LI120)
Moderator: Samuel Y. Liang, Assistant Professor of Humanities and the Coordinator of Chinese Studies, Utah Valley University

Environmental Ethics Keynote Address:

"This Was the Place: Environmental Memory in the Great Basin"
Jared Farmer, Associate Professor of History, State University of New York, Stony Brook
Introduction: Steven Clark, Associate Dean, CHSS

11:30-12:40 p.m., Library Auditorium (LI 120)

Environmental Technology and Urbanization:

"Green infrastructure design for storm water management in community development"
Bo Yang, Assistant Professor of Landscape Architecture and Environmental Planning, Utah State University

"Difficulties in Transferring Environmental Technologies to China: Cleaning up the Process"
David McArthur, Associate Professor, Department of Management, Utah Valley University
Manuel C. Menendez III, Chairman of the Board China National Coal EEG Mining Machinery Co. Ltd.

"Rapid urbanization in China: A story of Shenzhen"
Shujuan Li, Assistant Professor of Landscape Architecture and Environmental Planning, Utah State University
Moderator: Wayne Hanewicz, Professor of Integrated Studies and Philosophy, Utah Valley University
1 – 2:15 p.m., Library Auditorium (LI120) 

Featured Speaker, Peace & Justice Studies:

"Nuclear Deterrence in President Obama's United States and in President Putin's Russia: Echos from the Cold War and Unfinished Business"
Matthew McKinzie, Director, Nuclear Program and Senior Scientist, Lands and Wildlife Program, National Resources Defense Council
Introduction: Micheal Minch, Professor of Philosophy & Director of Peace and Justice Studies, Utah Valley University
2:30 – 3:45 p.m., Library Auditorium (LI120)

Featured Speaker, Chinese Environmental Studies:

"China: its environment and history"
Robert B. Marks, Professor of History and Environmental Studies, Whittier College
Moderator: Jeffrey S Nielsen, Adjunct Instructor, Philosophy and Humanities Department, Utah Valley University
4 – 5:10 p.m., Library Auditorium (LI120)

Closing Remarks:

Samuel Y. Liang, Assistant Professor of Humanities and the Coordinator of Chinese Studies, Utah Valley University
5:10 -5:20 p.m.

Environmental Ethics Schedule PDF

For additional information on the symposium and speakers, please visit the University Forum, Environmental Ethics Conference site.

May 12 - 16 - Ethics Across the Curriculum Faculty Summer Seminar

'LIMITED TO 35 FACULTY/ADJUNCT PARTICIPANTS' 

"Moral Machines: Ethics and Governance of Emerging Technologies"

Twenty-Seventh Annual Ethics Across the Curriculum Faculty Summer Seminar
Visiting Scholar: Wendell Wallach, Author, Moral Machines: Teaching Robots Right from Wrong
1-4:00 p.m. daily, [SC213C (Trustee Suite)]
(Organized by Elaine Englehardt, Distinguished Professor of Ethics)

This is a "first come,first accepted" situation. Each participant must agree to attend all sessions for the complete amount of time. Please send an email to susanna.garcia@uvu.edu if you are interested in participating.

Wendell Wallach is a consultant, ethicist, and scholar at Yale University's Interdisciplinary Center for Bioethics. He chairs the Center's working research group on Technology and Ethics and is a member of other research groups on Animal Ethics, End of Life Issues, Neuroethics, and PTSD. Wendell co-authored (with Colin Allen) Moral Machines: Teaching Robots Right From Wrong (Oxford University Press 2009), which maps the new field of enquiry variously called machine ethics, machine morality, computational morality, or friendly AI.


Wendell Wallach is a lecturer at the Interdisciplinary Center for Bioethics. The question that pervades Mr. Wallach's work at the Center is: how will we navigate the promise, perils, and bioethical challenges posed by new technologies? While much of the discussion regarding the manner in which technological enhancements will transform human identity and community is highly speculative, we are beset by a host of ethical dilemmas arising from the technologies we already have. New technologies not only afford new possibilities as to what we might become, but also facilitate research into who we are and how each of us functions. His work over the past few years has focused on the manner in which the "Information Age" and cognitive science are transforming our understanding of human decision-making and ethics. A radically new vision of human nature is emerging that challenges traditional beliefs systems and the laws and institutions built around those beliefs. A book that he is currently writing, Cybersoul: Moral Intelligence in the Information Age, explores this subject. He has also been active in developing the new field of inquiry known as Machine Ethics, Machine Morality, or Artificial Morality, which explores the prospects for developing artificial agents capable of making moral decisions. The field looks at both the possibility of implementing morality in software agents and artificial entities, and what we will learn about human ethics and decision-making as we go through this exercise.


In addition to chairing the Center for Bioethics working research group on "Technology and Ethics," he also leads a seminar for the Bioethics Center Summer Intern Program, coordinates activities for a study group on religious and spiritual issues in bioethics, and is a member of the Center's "Neuroethics" study group. He is a recognized leader in the new field of Machine Ethics for which he was first to design a course.


Another area of Wallace's work is "Lethal Autonomous Robots, or "LARs" for short." These are machines that can decide to take human life. Such a technology has the potential to revolutionize modern warfare and more. Opponents call LARs "killer robots" because they are deadly or "lethal." They are "autonomous" because they "can select and engage targets without further intervention by a human operator," based on the data they process in the battlefield, and based on the algorithms that guide their behavior. The need for understanding LARs is essential to decide whether their development and possible deployment should be regulated or banned. This TechDebate centers on the question: Are LARs ethical?

Moral Machines blog

Announcements:

New Director of the Center for the Study of Ethics:

Academic Affairs is pleased to announce that Brian Birch has been appointed to serve as the Director of the Center for the Study of Ethics. The Center has a long and distinguished history beginning in 1993; and has played an important role in integrating ethics across the UVU curricula and programs, promoting ethical dialogue, practice and research. Over the years the Center has developed several signature programs including Ethics Awareness Week; the Excellence in Ethics Award; the Faculty Summer Seminar (5 days); Environmental Ethics Symposium; the Kirk Englehardt Business Ethics Award; and the Faculty Ethics Fellowship program.

As the Director, Brian will play a key role in charting the future direction of the Center building upon the established success and reputation. In collaboration with departments and faculty, he will craft a plan for the scope of programs and activities of the Center and its potential contribution within the state as well as nationally and internationally. In keeping with its long-term mission, the Center will continue to reach out and involve all areas of the campus and all disciplines.

Brian has a Ph.D. in the Philosophy of Religion and Theology, and a master and bachelor degrees in Philosophy. He has held several administrative positions at UVU including Associate Dean of the College of Humanities and Social Sciences (2008 to 2010), Director of the Religious Studies Program (since 2002), Department Chair of Philosophy and Humanities (2003 to 2006), and as Associate Director of the Center for the Study of Ethics from 1999 to 2006. During this time, Brian established the Utah Democracy Project and served as the founding editor of Teaching Ethics, the journal of the Society for Ethics Across the Curriculum. His academic specializations include philosophy of religion, ethics education, and comparative religious studies.

After nearly four years of service as Associate Vice President for Engaged Learning, Brian will be returning to the faculty on July 1, 2014 and his appointment as Director will begin at this time.

There is a new face in the Center for the Study of Ethics:

Susanna Garcia is the new program coordinator of the Center for the Study of Ethics.

Susanna was chosen after a competitive job search by a committee chaired by Elaine Englehardt and comprised of Kim Bartholomew, Associate Director of the CSE, Jill Jasperson, former Associate Director of the CSE, and Jessica Awtry, Administrative Support, Office of Engaged Learning.

Susanna graduated from the University of Utah with a B.S. in Social and Behavioral Science and Environmental Studies. Prior to working for UVU, she worked in the non-profit field of international development for 8 years. She has extensive experience on meeting the needs of people and communities in the developing world. Susanna speaks and writes Spanish fluently. She has worked as a Spanish web consultant for an environmental organization which linked people and technology to resources to support urban and community forests. Her humanitarian service has included projects in Guatemala, Peru and Ecuador. Susanna has volunteered with Meals on Wheels, Red Cross, Save our Canyons, Splore, Utah Aids Foundation and Utah Society for Environmental Education.

At a CSE event, please introduce yourself to Susanna and welcome her to the UVU campus!

Faculty Fellows in Ethics

The Ethics Across the Curriculum Faculty Advisory Committee (EACFAC) is proud to announce the 2013-2014 Faculty Fellows in Ethics: Scott Hatch, Lecturer in English and Literature, as the University Faculty Fellow in Ethics for Liberal Arts and Science and Nancy L. Peterson, Professor of Education, as the University Faculty Fellow in Ethics for the Professions. You can learn more about the Faculty Fellows in Ethics Program here.

 

Center for the Study of Ethics

 

The Center for the Study of Ethics is an academic organization serving the campus of Utah Valley University and our Utah County community. The aim of the Ethics Center is to provide a forum in which a variety of ethical issues can be discussed in an atmosphere of openness and impartiality. We seek to promote the Jeffersonian ideal of an educated citizenry by bringing diverse voices together in thoughtful and productive dialogue.

The Center for the Study of Ethics promotes the study of interdisciplinary ethics at UVU by offering regular and special events designed to foster community, student and faculty discussions of ethics.

Our driving philosophy is centered on the belief that ethics is a dimension of academic inquiry rather than an isolated philosophical discipline.

All UVU Ethics Center forums are free and open to the public.

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