This guide is designed by students, for students, as a go-to resource for the upcoming elections, providing essential information to help you make informed decisions. As members of the UVU community, it's crucial that we actively engage in the democratic process and exercise our right to vote. The Herbert Institute Election Guide aims to empower students with knowledge about candidates, their platforms, and the issues impacting our community. By understanding the impact of your vote, you can shape the future of our community and beyond.

Thank you for participating in the democratic process and your commitment to civic engagement. Let's make our voices heard!

Voter Registration Information

Requirements:

  • You must be a U.S. citizen
  • You must be a resident of Utah for at least 30 days before the election
  • You must be at least 18 years old on or before the next election
  • You must not have been convicted of a felony, or if you have, you must have had your rights restored

 

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Voting Methods and Locations

Looking for how and where to vote in upcoming elections? Utah allows voters to vote by mail (or dropbox), vote early in-person at various voting locations, and in-person on election day. Click below and enter your street address for information on you can how to vote in the upcoming elections. 

 

Check How/Where to Vote

Election Dates

 

Primary Election

June 25th, 2024

 

Other Important Dates:

June 4 - Regular Primary Election ballots mailed out

June 11 - In-person early voting period begins

June 14 - Last day to register to vote in the regular primary election

June 21 - In-person early voting period ends

June 24 - Last day mail-in ballots can be postmarked

General Election

November 5th, 2024

 

Other Important Dates:

October 15 - General Election Ballots mailed out

October 22 - In-person early voting period begins

October 25 - Last day to register to vote in the regular general election

November 1 - In-person early voting period ends

November 4 - Last day mail-in ballots can be postmarked

 

Candidate Information

 

U.S. Senate

Headshot of Carlton Bowen
Candidate for US Senate
Carlton Bowen
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Carlton Bowen
CANDIDATE FOR US Senate
Independent American

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Independent American Party Convention Candidate.

Candidate will appear on the General Election Ballot in November.

Headshot of John Curtis
Candidate for US Senate
John Curtis
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John Curtis
CANDIDATE FOR US Senate
Republican

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Collected signatures to qualify for the Primary Election in June.

Candidate is currently serving as a congressman in Utah's 3rd Congressional District.

Headshot of Caroline Geilch
Candidate for US Senate
Caroline Gleich
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Caroline Gleich
CANDIDATE FOR US Senate
Democratic

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Democratic Convention Candidate.

Candidate will appear on the General Election Ballot in November.

Headshot of Trent Staggs
Candidate for US Senate
Trent Staggs
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Trent Staggs
Candidate for US Senate
Republican

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GOP Convention Candidate.

Candidate will appear on the Primary Election Ballot in June.

Headshot of Jason Walton
Candidate for US Senate
Jason Walton
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Jason Walton
Candidate for US Senate
Republican

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Collected signatures to qualify for the Primary Election in June.

Headshot of Brad Wilson
Candidate for US Senate
Brad Wilson
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Brad Wilson
Candidate for US Senate
Republican

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Collected signatures to qualify for the Primary Election in June.

Candidate's Response on:

Student Loan Forgiveness

President Biden's student loan forgiveness scheme is as unfair as it is unconstitutional. The President does not have the authority to unilaterally forgive debts and spend millions of taxpayer dollars without Congressional approval. Period. It's also morally wrong. Student loan forgiveness does not "cancel" the debt, it transfers the obligation from doctors and lawyers with six-figure salaries onto the backs of the 87% of Americans who do not have student loans and who often earn less than those with expensive degrees. Millions of Americans worked hard, played by the rules, made tough sacrifices to pay off their debt, or chose different paths to avoid student debt all together. But now some want to give those who didn't play by the same rules a free pass. As a father, I get it: college is too expensive and more needs to be done to hold colleges accountable for it. But wiping out student debt only encourages colleges to further inflate the cost of tuition, pushes students to take out additional debt on the false promise that additional forgiveness is coming, and is unfair to the overwhelming majority of the country who do not have college degrees and would now be forced to shoulder this tax burden.

Housing Affordability

As a homebuilder of over 30 years, I can tell you right now: the cost of housing has gotten way out of hand. Housing costs in Utah have increased at almost twice as fast as the median income. Two of the biggest drivers of housing costs are interest rates and supply. Unfortunately, runaway spending from the Biden Administration has caused interest rates to skyrocket and made mortgages far less affordable for working Americans. If you buy a house today, your mortgage payment is almost twice what it would have been a few years ago, even if the price of the house was the same. Cutting spending to get inflation under control is the first step to bringing down interest rates, which will help more Americans be able to afford a home. But we also have too few homes available for the demand, which is why prices have skyrocketed. We need to build more housing of all kinds, quickly. We should look to areas where we can cut red tape and streamline the process for builders to get more housing built everywhere which will increase supply and make it more affordable to rent or buy a home.

College Affordability

As the father of three, the rising cost of college is personal to me. College has more than quintupled in price over the past 50 years and it's putting the American Dream further and further out of reach for too many. The biggest issue is the lack of accountability. Colleges have amassed nearly $900 billion in their endowments, while collecting trillions in taxpayer benefits, driving students into $1.8 trillion of debt, jacking up tuition rates, while spending more time indoctrinating our kids with their political agenda than in preparing them to enter the workforce. Colleges push kids to take out debt and get degrees that don't always lead to real job opportunities. Colleges need to have skin in the game on the debt that they encourage our kids to take out. Senator Mike Lee's HERO Act would be one great way to approach this. Furthermore, higher education institutions waste millions on racist diversity, equity and inclusion programs that drive up costs and need to be outlawed. Additionally, we also need to do more to encourage students to explore alternative higher education programs from trade schools to apprenticeships, which often provide even better job opportunities than many traditional degree programs.

Elections Policy

In 2020, Democrats used COVID to change election laws in their favor and now they're pushing to make those changes permanent nationwide. As conservatives, we need to fight back even harder. Restoring faith in our elections starts with taking voter fraud seriously and passing a national voter ID requirement. It makes no sense that you need an ID to board a plane or enter an office building, but do not need one to vote in our elections. It's outrageous that liberals in places like Washington, D.C. and San Francisco are now moving to allow illegals to vote in their elections. As Speaker, I supported having external audits as part of the process, authorized the Legislative Auditor's office to audit the election outcome in Utah to ensure transparency and accuracy, and I passed new legislation to increase the security of our elections. In the Senate, restoring the security of our elections would be a top priority, just as it has been here in Utah

Land Conservation

Water and land management are some of the most important issues to us in Utah. The federal government owns almost 2/3 the land in our state and water is one of the most important long-term issues we continue to face. In the Senate, I'll continue to fight tooth and nail to stop federal overreach on our lands and to protect every drop of water that is ours. In Utah, I sued the Biden Administration over his unlawful land grab with the Bears Ears and Grande Staircase-Escalante National Monuments, sued to stop his radical environmental agenda with the 'Good Neighbor Rule' and have consistently stood up to protect our lands from federal overreach. I also spearheaded the creation of Utah's Colorado River Authority to protect our portion of the water rights to the Colorado River. The new authority's creation puts us on equal footing with other states and ensures we aren't fighting with one hand behind our back as other states try to take our share of the water that is rightfully ours. In the Senate, I will continue to stand up to the federal government's overreach to protect our lands and way of life.

 
 

Out in Convention

Headshot of Jeremy Freidbaum
Candidate for US Senate
Jeremy Friedbaum
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Jeremy Friedbaum
Candidate for US Senate
Republican

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Candidate voted out in GOP Convention on April 27, 2024.

Headshot of Laird Fetzer Hamblin
Candidate for US Senate
Laird Fetzer Hamblin
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Laird Fetzer Hamblin
Candidate US  Senate
Democratic

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Candidate voted out in Democratic Convention on April 27, 2024.

Headshot of Brent Hatch
Candidate for US Senate
Brent Hatch
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Brent Hatch
Candidate for US  Senate
Republican

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Candidate voted out in GOP Convention on April 27, 2024.

Headshot of Brian Jenkins
Candidate for US Senate
Brian Jenkins
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Brian Jenkins
Candidate for US  Senate
Republican

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Candidate voted out in GOP Convention on April 27, 2024.

Headshot of Robert Newcomb
Candidate for US Senate
Robert Newcomb
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Robert Newcomb
Candidate for US Senate
Independent American

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Candidate voted out in the Independent American Convention on April 27, 2024.

Headshot of Carolyn Phippen
Candidate for US Senate
Carolyn Phippen
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Carolyn Phippen
Candidate for US Senate
Republican

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Candidate voted out in GOP Convention on April 27, 2024.

Headshot of Josh Randall
Candidate for US Senate
Josh Randall
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Josh Randall
Candidate for US Senate
Republican

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Candidate voted out in GOP Convention on April 27, 2024.

Candidate's Response on:

Student Loan Forgiveness

I don't believe the federal government should be in the business of providing student loans. But for loan contracts that have already been entered into voluntarily by students, the commitments of the loan recipient and the lender (the federal government) should be fully enforced. It is just to all parties when the terms of student loans are strictly adhered to as agreed upon when the loan was entered into. Just to the student, the government, and to taxpayers in general. I don't consider it appropriate or moral for the executive branch to forgive loans at the expense of taxpayers.

Housing Affordability

The first issue I would address is securing our border. Our laws require every immigrant to come into the country through checkpoints, monitored by our border patrol. A massive influx of "getaways" has contributed to a ballooned demand for housing that was already in short supply. I also support privatizing habitable BLM land in Utah. As a Senator I would sponsor and support legislation to auction off federal land to the State of Utah and citizens of Utah.

College Affordability

 I would begin by imposing salary caps on NCAA and NAIA coaches and athletic department personnel at every university in the country that is participating in intercollegiate sports with our public universities. The cap would match their pay to that of the average faculty and staff of each university. Ancillary sports programs would still bring in revenues without creating an elite class of coaches and athletic directors that are a major university expense. Funds from athletics can be redirected to lowering tuition costs for students. We also need to address a somewhat broken tenure system in our universities. Large salaries and pay raises have become automatic for "tenured" professors. I would advocate for "at will" employment that incentivizes ensuring performance of students. As students perform better, they will be better equipped to pay down their debts and secure high paying work after they finish university studies. 

Elections Policy

Elections laws are primarily handled by state legislatures. The public must have confidence that elections are fair and accurate. Proof of citizenship and photo identification are appropriate checks to ensure that votes are legitimate and traceable to eligible, citizen voters. I would advocate for term limits of 12 years for U.S. Senators and 8 years for representatives. I would also advocate for election spending caps. In a digital age, I believe it is entirely appropriate to cap spending for federal elections to $15,000 per US Senate or House candidate, and $5,000 for state Senate and House candidates. Our campaign is practicing what I'm preaching. We have had other candidates reach out to us to inquire about and incorporate some of our same campaigning methods. A frugal campaign is possible, and we are modeling how to do it. We don't need to buoy up an elections industry. It doesn't help produce the needed commodities that are in short supply, nor does it generally add to the morale of our country. 

Land Conservation

 Utah works hard at wildfire prevention and has always been innovative with water conservation. Damming seasonal snow melt runoff and channeling it to communities snow get aways melt through an intricate canal system has allowed the second driest state in the country to fill our counties with foliage, trees, vegetation, and farming that make Utah a great place to live. Land and conservation issues need to continuously be monitored. As a Senator, I would regularly meet with the hundreds of mayors and city councils across the state to ensure that Utahns are being heard and the best ideas advocated to conserve and preserve our resources. In general, I will advocate for more federal land to be converted to Utah and privately held land by the citizens of Utah. Utahns know best about how to manage the land of our great state.

Headshot of Chandler Tanner
Candidate for US Senate
Chandler Tanner
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Chandler Tanner
Candidate for US Senate
Republican

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Candidate voted out in GOP Convention on April 27, 2024.

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Candidate for US Senate
Clark White
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Clark White
Candidate for US Senate
Republican

Candidate voted out in GOP Convention on April 27, 2024.

Headshot of Archie Williams
Candidate for US Senate
Archie Williams III
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Archie Williams III
Candidate for US Senate
Democratic

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Candidate voted out in Democratic Convention on April 27, 2024.

 
 

U.S. House

Headshot of Candidate
Candidate for US Congress - Utah's 1st Congressional District
Bill Campbell
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Bill Campbell
CANDIDATE FOR US Congress - Utah's 1st Congressional district
Democratic

Running uncontested as the Democratic candidate for Utah's 1st Congressional District. 

Candidate will appear on the General Election Ballot in November.

Headshot of Daniel Cottam
Candidate for US Congress - Utah's 1st Congressional District
Daniel Cottam
Decorative photo of Daniel Cottam

Daniel Cottam
CANDIDATE FOR US Congress - Utah's 1st Congressional District
Libertarian

Election Candidate.

Candidate will appear on the General Election Ballot in November.

Headshot of Paul Miller
Candidate for US Congress - Utah's 1st Congressional District
Paul Miller
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Paul Miller
CANDIDATE FOR US Congress - Utah's 1st Congressional District
Republican

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GOP Convention Candidate.

Candidate will appear on the Primary Election Ballot in June.

Headshot of Blake Moore
Candidate for US Congress - Utah's 1st Congressional District
Blake Moore
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Blake Moore
Candidate US Congress - Utah's 1st Congressional District
Republican

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GOP Convention Candidate.

Candidate collected signatures to qualify for the Primary Election in June.

Candidate is currently serving in this position.

Headshot of Cassie Easley
Candidate for US Congress - Utah's 2nd Congressional District
Cassie Easley
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Cassie Easley
Candidate for US Congress - Utah's 2nd Congressional District
Constitution

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Election Candidate.

Candidate will appear on the General Election Ballot in November.

Headshot of Colby Jenkins
Candidate for US Congress - Utah's 2nd Congressional District
Colby Jenkins
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Colby Jenkins
Candidate for US Congress - Utah's 2nd Congressional District
Republican

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GOP Convention Candidate.

Candidate will appear on the Primary Election Ballot in June.

Headshot of Celeste Maloy
Candidate for US Congress - Utah's 2nd Congressional District
Celeste Maloy
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Celeste Maloy
Candidate for US Congress - Utah's 2nd Congressional District
Republican

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GOP Convention Candidate.

Candidate will appear on the Primary Election Ballot in June.

Candidate is currently serving in this position.

Headshot of Tyler Murset
Candidate for US Congress - Utah's 2nd Congressional District
Tyler Murset
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Tyler Murset
Candidate for US Congress - Utah's 2nd Congressional District
Unaffiliated

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Information Coming Soon.

Headshot of JR Bird
Candidate for US Congress - Utah's 3rd Congressional District
JR Bird
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JR Bird
Candidate for US Congress - Utah's 3rd Congressional District
Republican

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Collected signatures to qualify for the Primary Election in June.

Headshot of John Dougall
Candidate for US Congress - Utah's 3rd Congressional District
John Dougall
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John Dougall
Candidate for US Congress - Utah's 3rd Congressional District
Republican

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Collected signatures to qualify for the Primary Election in June.

Candidate's Response on:

Student Loan Forgiveness

 

Students are feeling crushed by debt. Many students were told: “Go to college. Whatever the cost, it will be worth it.” As a result, they took out large loans pursuing that objective. Unfortunately, students are learning that instruction wasn’t always true. The high cost of college tuition, as well as the extra cost for textbooks, fees, food, and housing, puts student and Utah families under severe financial strain. Frankly, the federal government holds much of the blame. When the government interferes, regardless of its intentions, the result typically drives up costs. If you can jump through the regulatory hoops, you might personally get a minor benefit but others are left paying inflated costs. And sometimes the federal government fails to pay what was initially promised. College is too expensive. And student loan forgiveness only makes that problem worse, rewarding colleges for inflating their costs. While it sounds counterintuitive, government subsidies made college more expensive. The New York Federal Reserve Bank found that colleges raised their prices 60 cents for every dollar increase in “subsidized” student loans. A student loan forgiveness scheme would result in similar increases. Instead, the federal government should stop rewarding colleges for inflating their costs. Colleges should focus on providing students with the best educational value. Additionally, a civil society demands respect for the rule of law and an orderly process to repeal bad laws. Neither President Biden, nor any other president, should engage in illegal or unlawful activities, including student loan forgiveness.
Housing Affordability
Many Utahns are anxious about whether they can buy a home or afford rent. With skyrocketing housing costs, and interest rates ballooning to 7%, home ownership seems impossible for young families just starting their professional lives. Housing costs rose partly because of government policies which drove reckless spending, inventing artificially high demand, while imposing policies which restrict supply. It’s simple economics: inflation results from too much money chasing too few goods. The Federal Reserve drove up Interest rates to control inflation caused by misguided congressional spending which increased consumer demand for goods and commodities that were in limited supply. Inflation could have been avoided by avoiding reckless spending. Unfortunately, as inflation started to rise, the Biden Administration made it worse, expanding regulations that choked supply. State and local governments also added additional regulations which make needed housing less affordable and less available. A free market rewards businesses for meeting consumer demands, controlling costs by rewarding new entrants. But regulations and red tape allow government and corporations to collude to the disadvantage of new home buyers. Eliminating federal, state, and city policies which heavily restrict housing availability will expand housing and address housing affordability. Simply adding another subsidy program fails to address the underlying program. Those programs are often designed for elected officials to give money to politically-connected “friends” while appearing to help those in need. Unfortunately, higher tax burdens also reduce the amount of money a potential homeowner has available to buy a home.

College Affordability

College is too expensive. And now many students are learning that they could have a better paying job without the high expenses of a college degree. When we “shop” with our own money, we typically use it more carefully than someone else’s money. The same is true for college. When mom and dad, or Uncle Sam (aka the federal government), pay for college, most of us aren’t as careful as when we spend our own money. As State Auditor, I’ve fought to eliminate excessive college fees, which place a burden on all students for the benefit of a few. Those fees aren’t right! Just because a student or administrator might have a good idea doesn’t mean every student should be forced to pay for it. Colleges should focus on providing the best value to students, not administrators pursuing pet projects, building fancy buildings and sports facilities, on the backs of students and taxpayers.

Elections Policy

Elections should be free, fair, and secure. Ronald Reagan taught, “Trust but verify!” We need elections that we can trust but that trust relies on our ability to verify the accuracy of those results. We need to continue to strengthen the integrity of the election process, each and every election. Elections are primarily administered by the states. Ensuring states control the “times, places, and manner” of their elections builds transparency, accountability, and security in our elections. Expanding federal involvement in elections is concerning. Centralizing elections makes them more susceptible to hackers and bad actors, whether foreign or domestic, who want to control the election outcomes. First, the fact that our elections are diffused and controlled at the precinct level adds a level of security – it is impossible to hack an election at a large scale. Additionally, since people have concerns about the integrity of elections, trust expands as local city, county, and state officials – those closest to the people – answer for those concerns. Congress should ensure that the federal government does not centralize elections, making them more susceptible to attack and less supported by public trust.

Land Conservation

For years I’ve taught, “Whoever controls the land controls the economy.” Too often, especially in rural Utah, the federal government controls our land and our economy, and that control can whipsaw with the changing of each new administration. Imagine trying to plan your future when you are unsure whether the federal government will restrict or destroy your job, like ranching, manufacturing, or energy production. Consider the challenge placed on schools and communities when those public lands are exempted from paying taxes but still demand local government support (such as search and rescue). As a scout, I was taught to leave my campsite better than I found it. I don’t want to leave the earth worse than I found it. We can be wise stewards of our land and water without crippling our economy. And we should welcome extracting critical resources and minerals in America, where we are more environmentally sensitive, than offshoring it to places like Russia or China, while pretending that is better for the environment. A few years ago, I drove past a Toyota Prius with a bumper stick with the naïve call to “Stop mining!” The driver seemed to be oblivious to what it took to produce that car as well as the road that it drove on. That driver clearly wanted the benefits of our modern economy without recognizing the tradeoffs that go into it. Our energy consumption is a measure of our economic vitality. Americans demand affordable, reliable power. With the push to electrify our economy, we must not make the mistakes of California, reducing reliable power sources just as demand increases. We live in a desert. Water is a scarce and precious resource. We must encourage practices which promote wise water consumption and eliminate those subsidies which reward wasteful use.

Headshot of Mike Kennedy
Candidate for US Congress - Utah's 3rd Congressional District
Mike Kennedy
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Mike Kennedy
Candidate for US Congress - Utah's 3rd Congressional District
Republican

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GOP Convention Candidate.

Candidate will appear on the Primary Election Ballot in June

Headshot of Case Lawrence
Candidate for US Congress - Utah's 3rd Congressional District
Case Lawrence
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Case Lawrence
Candidate for US Congress - Utah's 3rd Congressional District
Republican

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Collected signatures to qualify for the Primary Election in June.

Headshot of Stewart Peay
Candidate for US Congress - Utah's 3rd Congressional District
Stewart Peay
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Stewart Peay
Candidate for US Congress - Utah's 3rd Congressional District
Republican

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Candidate collected signatures to qualify for the Primary Election in June.

Headshot of Glenn Wright
Candidate for US Congress - Utah's 3rd Congressional District
Glenn Wright
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Glenn Wright
Candidate for US Congress - Utah's 3rd Congressional District
Democratic

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Running uncontested as the Democratic candidate for Utah's 3rd Congressional District. 

Candidate will appear on the General Election Ballot in November.

Candidate's Response on:

Student Loan Forgiveness

Education at the four-year college level or in vocational trades is essential in establishing an individual’s earning potential. Encouraging this level of education for the broadest audience possible should be a priority of our society. In 6 years on the Summit County Council, I learned that many local and state-level government decisions involve setting priorities in our budgets. For the past several years, the priority of the state legislature has been to reduce the tax rate in the source of funding dedicated to higher and public education. Significant tuition reductions could have been made had those tax cuts not been made. That was not the legislature's priority. Relative spending support by state governments has been in decline across the country. This is not to say that creating more efficiency in administering the education experience is unimportant. This project should be jointly discussed among students, university teaching staff, and university management.

Housing Affordability

The wide availability of student loans has allowed educational institutions to raise prices and maintain student body sizes. Many (most?) students are probably not looking at the end state of their student indebtedness or their likely earning potential when they take out their first student loan. Counseling on this subject should be part of presenting a financial package to every student. Would some level of student debt cancellation benefit both the student and society? Probably so. Federal legislators need to make that decision as part of a discussion on the national debt, economic growth, and general welfare. I am generally in favor of forgiving some federal student debt. Another approach would be reducing the federal student loan interest rate to 0%. I need to see some CBO estimates of the cost of any of these approaches and the economic benefits to the nation due to these decisions to advocate for exact amounts.

College Affordability

Housing affordability and its solutions have implications at the local, state, and federal levels of government. There is a housing shortage in virtually every part of Utah and most of the nation. Supply and demand drive up prices. Local zoning decisions have a large impact on availability and affordability. The cost of housing is heavily impacted by density. The more units that can be constructed per acre, the lower the land and infrastructure costs are. The traditional single-family detached house is no longer affordable in most urban and suburban areas. The starter home in these areas will more likely be a stacked condo or rental property. And even in rural areas, duplexes, quadplexes, and row houses are becoming more common. When this type of development is proposed, the NIMBY’s come out. Many people acknowledge the need for affordable housing, but few want it in their backyards. At the local level, we need a government that can resist the NIMBYs and make the right decisions. This will involve approving unpopular developments and incorporating inclusionary zoning, i.e., requiring a minimum percentage of affordable housing in every new development. At the state level, we need policies encouraging cities and counties to support and approve dense, affordable housing. At the national level, we need to support affordable housing programs like LIHTC (low-income housing tax credits) and other tax and spending subsidies found in HUD and the Department of Agriculture Rural development programs. An equally important federal initiative is to promote policies that encourage another “Great Compression” so that we can return to a time when a median household income could purchase a median-priced house. Until we reach that goal, builders will provide housing where the market demands it at higher prices. Another detriment to providing an adequate housing supply is the lack of labor in the construction trades. Increased legal immigration and encouragement of union-based apprenticeship programs are needed to supply the labor required to solve our housing crises.

Elections Policy

Utah has an excellent election system—probably one of the best in the country. Voter registration is nearly automatic (opt-out) if a person has a driver's license. Change of address is also virtually automatic if a person changes address on their driver's license. 100 % mail-in voting is easy and efficient. Turnout increased when 100% mail-in balloting started state-wide. Same-day registration and voting work well. The person fills out a provisional ballot while the County Clerk verifies the supplied residency information. The system relies on the diligence and professionalism of the county clerk and staff, and there have been occasional hiccups. The Clerk position is elected, and voters must elect competent Clerks. Complaints about a lack of drop boxes in some rural counties have been made, and state legislation may be needed to address this issue. The call for same-day paper ballot voting is counterproductive from an efficiency, accuracy, voter access, and cost standpoint. The LG’s office conducts post-election audits in every county. As many as ⅓ of eligible voters are not registered to vote.

Land Conservation

Federal public land in Utah was acquired by war (Mexican 1846-48) and coercive treaties with Native American tribes. A faction claims that the federal government discriminated against the West because most states east of the Rockies have little public land, and the western states have large percentages of public lands. The Homestead Act of 1862 (and several subsequent acts) was the principal reason for this, which gave 160 acres to any family who would farm it for five years. Most of the land east of the Rockies was acquired by settlers, but most of the mountainous terrain in the western states was not. The unclaimed land was turned over to the Forest Service or Bureau of Land Management for multiple uses, including recreation, conservation, grazing, mining, and drilling. States were given 4 out of 36 sections in every track of public lands. SITLA, now the Utah Land Trust, has engaged in multiple land swaps to consolidate holdings. It is important to remind people that public lands are owned and managed by the federal government for the benefit of all Americans— even though many in Utah chafe at federal management of public lands. Current disputes involve mining, drilling, grazing, and road usage. Oil and Gas drilling - less than 10% of land-based oil and gas production occurs on public lands. Those concerned about Climate Change believe that we need to stop burning fossil fuels over the next quarter century, and there is no need and a public benefit to stop extracting oil and gas from public lands. The O+G industry is obviously against this concept. To drill or not to drill is a decision made by our elected federal officials. I am in the no-drill camp. Mining - burning coal is the most destructive of the climate and should be stopped on public lands, consistent with existing production leases. Mining minerals needed by the renewable energy and electric vehicle industries benefits the public welfare, but it must be done under the strictest EPA guidelines and in consultation with neighboring communities. The Mining Act of 1872 resulted in hundreds of abandoned mines and allowed the environmental degradation associated with those mines to go unmitigated. Uranium mining and milling have a history of causing disease among miners and water pollution in neighboring communities. Those communities must have a say in any future uranium exploitation. The White Mesa Mill in San Juan County has caused incredible water pollution problems with the aquifer. Those issues must be rectified. While Utah has significant uranium deposits, there are other larger deposits in the west where exploitation is less likely to cause community degradation. There are continuing disputes regarding roads (RS2477), off-road vehicle usage, and grazing between the state, local users, and the federal government. The best way to resolve these issues is consultation and negotiation, not litigation. Water - Climate Change is warming and drying the Southwest. Water is over-allocated within and between states; a reckoning is coming concerning water usage in the Colorado River drainage and the waters of the Great Salt Lake. As the population increases, water demand for human usage conflicts with agricultural usage. Historically, we have built water systems to bring water to agricultural users. In the future, agriculture may need to migrate to where the water resources exist. Economic aid for Ag communities in decline will have to be prioritized. If the Colorado River drainage states cannot agree on allocations, the federal government will need to step in and make unpopular decisions. Within state boundaries, the states will need to allocate water allocation between Ag and human use and water supplies for the GSL. Federal aid for resolving these problems may be warranted.

Headshot of Vaughn Cook
Candidate for US Congress - Utah's 4th Congressional District
Vaughn Cook
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Vaughn Cook
Candidate for US Congress - Utah's 4th Congressional District
United Utah

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Running uncontested as the United Utah candidate for Utah's 4th Congressional District.

Candidate will appear on the General Election Ballot in November.

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Candidate for US Congress - Utah's 4th Congressional District
Katrina Fallick-Wang
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Katrina Fallick-Wang
Candidate for US Congress - Utah's 4th Congressional District
Democratic

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Democratic Convention Candidate.

Candidate will appear on the Primary Election Ballot in November.

Candidate's Response on:

Student Loan Forgiveness

The student loan crisis is an embarrassment to our country. We cannot shackle students with mountains of debt and expect them to be able to participate in the economy. Student Loan forgiveness and affordable college education are critical to moving our country forward and improving the economy.

Housing Affordability

When 99% of Americans cannot afford to buy a home, how can we claim the "American Dream"? Homeownership is the cornerstone of that dream, providing healthier communities and decreasing crime. Hard-working Americans should be able to afford safe, comfortable homes for their families and should have access to the security and wealth building that home ownership provides.

College Affordability

 

Elections Policy

I believe we have done an exceptional job for years in providing fair elections. There is still work to be done to ensure that all valid voters are able to cast their ballots. 

Land Conservation

I believe we have done an exceptional job for years in providing fair elections. There is still work to be done to ensure that all valid voters are able to cast their ballots. 

Headshot of Burgess Owen
Candidate for US Congress - Utah's 4th Congressional District
Burgess Owens
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Burgess Owens
Candidate for US Congress - Utah's 4th Congressional District
Republican

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GOP Convention Candidate. 

Candidate will appear on the Primary Election Ballot in June.

Candidate is currently serving in this position.

 

Out in Convention

Headshot of Derek Draper
Candidate for US Congress - Utah's 1st Congressional  District
Derek Draper
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Derek Draper
Candidate for US Congress - Utah's 1st Congressional District
Republican

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Candidate voted out in GOP Convention on April 27, 2024.

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Candidate for US Congress - Utah's 2nd Congressional District
Brian Adams
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Brian Adams
Candidate for US Congress - Utah's 2nd Congressional District
Democratic

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Candidate withdrew from the race.

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Candidate for US Congress - Utah's 2nd Congressional District
Ty Jensen
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Ty Jensen
Candidate for US Congress - Utah's 2nd Congressional District
Republican

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Candidate voted out in GOP Convention on April 27, 2024.

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Candidate for US Congress - Utah's 3rd Congressional District
Lucky Bovo
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Lucky Bovo
Candidate for US Congress - Utah's 3rd Congressional District
Republican

Candidate voted out in GOP Convention on April 27, 2024.

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Candidate for US Congress - Utah's 3rd Congressional District
Kathryn Dahlin
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Kathryn Dahlin
Candidate for US Congress - Utah's 3rd Congressional District
Republican

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Candidate voted out in GOP Convention on April 27, 2024.

Candidate's Response on:

Student Loan Forgiveness

I believe that taking on Student Loans is a personal financial decision and students must be well educated about the costs and their income potential so that they understand that they are committing to repay the loans. Many students now believe that their loans will be forgiven through federal loan programs and so they may be making unwise fiscal decisions. Federal loan forgiveness programs disproportionately help upper-income earners and increase the burden on all taxpayers. Federal loan forgiveness also ignores and in no way addresses the root problem of inflated college costs. I strongly support private tuition reimbursement programs and believe many states and organizations have created valuable incentives for Americans wanting to pursue higher education opportunities.

Housing Affordability

There is a real crisis of affordable housing in America and right here in Utah. Home inventing ownership is not only part of the American Dream, but it creates stable communities and strengthens financial independence. I support efforts to increase opportunities for homeownership especially for low and very low-income families. Low Income Housing Tax Credit programs have been very effective and I would like to see them continued. Congress must balance the budget and end deficit spending so that the government can effectively continue incentive programs to increase opportunities for homeownership among all Americans. Congress should reduce bureaucratic hurdles, eliminate unnecessary regulations, and make it easier for affordable housing to be built. Local governments should also be empowered to find solutions that work best for their community.

College Affordability

Americans are rightly concerned over the increasing cost to attend college. When the government largely nationalized student loan debt in 2010 they created a bureaucracy where the US taxpayer is underwriting college tuition. Student loans used to be fixed-rate loans — like a mortgage or car loan — but were changed to a plan based on the student’s post-graduation income. Gradually, the borrower’s share of his college loans shrank, while the taxpayer’s increased. By taking the private market out of the system, the government has given the green light to colleges to raise prices while taxpayers are on the hook. This is bad for students looking for a cost effective education and it’s bad for taxpayers who are forced to pay the bill. Since the government took over the student loans, the nation’s total student debt has more than doubled, from $811 billion in April 2010 to $1.748 trillion in April 2022. Privatizing the student loan market would create a more market based system and would help stabilize costs. I believe students should also have access to accurate information so that they can make informed decisions when choosing where and what to study. It is crucial that there be transparency in college pricing and living costs, and graduation and job placement rates. Young adults should be encouraged to consider the path best for them, which will not always be a four-year degree. We must increase career and vocational training opportunities in and following high school. It is in our best interest to ensure that our schools are preparing our children with the real-life skills they need to thrive in their careers as adults.

Elections Policy

Elections are essential to the success of our democracy. Holding elections and ensuring that power can change hands in accordance with their outcomes is the essence of democratic self-governance. Ensuring fair elections is essential to protecting our rights and our system of government. We must ensure that we are able to hold fair elections. Election officials must be allowed to do their work without interference, our elections systems must be secure and politicians must not be allowed to dictate the outcome or manipulate election rules. The United States must be a leader in prioritizing free, fair and secure elections.

Land Conservation

Land policy is best decided by those closest to it. Roughly 71% of Utah is public land, managed by bureaucrats in Washington. We must have greater local and state involvement in the management of these lands. While Utah's representatives in Washington have made some progress, there is still much work to be done. Designating national monuments on Utah land has become a political conquest designed to bolster popularity for our most recent Democrat presidents. The Antiquities Act must be updated to end such abuse and ensure local and state input. As residents of Utah, we have a responsibility to take care of our wonderful state. We are often reminded of the need to preserve water and use our precious resources wisely. I support local efforts to make water and land use planning goals that will help preserve our resources and plan wisely for the future. Natural resources like the Great Salt Lake are indispensable and preservation should be a priority for our state and local governments.

Headshot of Chris Herrod
Candidate for US Congress - Utah's 3rd Congressional District
Chris Herrod
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Chris Herrod
Candidate for US Congress - Utah's 3rd Congressional District
Republican

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Candidate voted out in GOP Convention on April 27, 2024.

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Candidate for US Congress - Utah's 3rd Congressional District
Zac Wilson
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Zac Wilson
Candidate for US Congress - Utah's 3rd Congressional District
Republican

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Candidate voted out in GOP Convention on April 27, 2024.

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Candidate for US Congress - Utah's 4th Congressional District
Jonathan Lopez
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Jonathan Lopez
Candidate for US Congress - Utah's 4th Congressional District
Democratic

Candidate voted out in Democratic Convention on April 27, 2024.

Candidate elected not to respond to the Herbert Institute's request for comment on topics important to college students until after the general election.

Attorney General

Headshot of Rudy Bautista
Candidate for Attorney General
Rudy Bautista
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Rudy Bautista
CANDIDATE FOR Attorney General
Democratic

Democratic Convention Candidate.

Candidate will appear on the General Election Ballot in November.

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Candidate for Attorney General
Derek Brown
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Derek Brown
CANDIDATE FOR Attorney General
REPUBLICAN

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Collected signatures to qualify for the Primary Election in June.

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Candidate for Attorney General
Austin Hepworth
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Austin Hepworth
Candidate for Attorney General
Unaffiliated

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Information Coming Soon.

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Candidate for Attorney General
Andrew McCullough
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Andrew McCullough
Candidate for Attorney General
Libertarian

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Election Candidate. Candidate will appear on the General Election Ballot in November.

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Candidate for Attorney General
Frank Mylar
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Frank Mylar
Candidate for Attorney General
Republican

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GOP Convention Candidate. 

Candidate will appear on the Primary Election Ballot in June.

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Candidate for Attorney General
Michelle Quist
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Michelle Quist
Candidate for Attorney General
United Utah

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Running uncontested as the United Utah candidate for Attorney General.

Candidate will appear on the General Election Ballot in November.

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Candidate for Attorney General
Rachel Terry
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Rachel Terry
Candidate for Attorney General
Republican

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GOP Convention Candidate.

Candidate will appear on the Primary Election Ballot in June.

 

Out in Convention

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Candidate for Attorney General
David Carlson
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David Carlson
Candidate for Attorney General
Democratic

Candidate voted out in Democratic Convention on April 27, 2024.

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Candidate for Attorney General
Trent Christensen
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Trent Christensen
CANDIDATE FOR Attorney General
Republican

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Candidate voted out in GOP Convention on April 27, 2024.

 
 

Utah Governor

Headshot of Spencer J. Cox
Candidate for Governor
Spencer J. Cox
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Spencer J. Cox
CANDIDATE FOR GOVERNOR
REPUBLICAN

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Collected signatures to qualify for the Primary Election in June.

Candidate is currently serving in this position.

Headshot of Brian King
Candidate for Governor
Brian King
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Brian King
CANDIDATE FOR GOVERNOR
DEMOCRATIC

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Running uncontested as the Democratic candidate for Governor.

Candidate will appear on the General Election Ballot in November.

Headshot of J. Robert Latham
Candidate for Governor
J. Robert Latham
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J. Robert Latham
Candidate for Governor
Libertarian

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Election Candidate.

Candidate will appear on the General Election Ballot in November.

Headshot of Phil Lyman
Candidate for Governor
Phil Lyman
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Phil Lyman
Candidate for Governor
Republican

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GOP Convention Candidate.

Candidate will appear on the Primary Election Ballot in June.

Headshot of Tom Tomeny
Candidate for Governor
Tom Tomeny
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Tom Tomeny
Candidate for Governor
Unaffiliated

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Candidate's Response on:

Student Loan Forgiveness

Almost all of the people with student loans were lied to about the costs and benefits of the education they were buying to one extent or another. The institutions that did the lying should be held accountable. Many of these institutions should sell their assets in order to pay back the student's loans as most of those assets won't be needed for the future version of education.

Housing Affordability

Housing is unaffordable because it is over-regulated by special interests. We have the technology to mass produce small houses of high quality. Those houses can become affordable homes when it is possible to site them in vastly more places that they are currently prohibited from occupying. 

College Affordability

The college of the 20th century will soon be as dead as the dinosaurs. The new era of colleges will be online institutions funded by private entities, including churches and large employers, that will be free to all students. And the students will still get the sociality of college by gathering together in their local communities with mentors in order to study.

Elections Policy

In the short term, we must go back to in person paper ballot voting with ID for all. In the longer term, a new form of the internet will emerge, something that I actually invented back in 2007 and presented at conferences in Silicon Valley, the Trusted Identity Network. That sort of network will have protocols of sufficient security to allow for online secure voting.

Land Conservation

Land and water and all property is best managed by the people who own it. The Federal government will likely need to sell off much of its land and water rights in order to pay down the massive debt. And it should be sold to people, not corporations with limited liability. Then a free market will result in better allocation of resources than is presently possible.

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Candidate for Governor
Tommy Williams
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Tommy Williams
Candidate for Governor
Independent American

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Independent American Party Convention Candidate.

Candidate will appear on the Primary Election Ballot in November.

 
 

Out in Convention

Headshot of Sylvia Miera-Fisk
Candidate for Governor
Sylvia Miera-Fisk
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Sylvia Miera-Fisk
CANDIDATE FOR GOVERNOR
REPUBLICAN

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Candidate voted out in GOP Convention on April 27, 2024.

Headshot of Carson Jorgensen
Candidate for Governor
Carson Jorgensen
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Carson Jorgensen
Candidate for Governor
Republican

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Candidate voted out in GOP Convention on April 27, 2024.

Headshot of Scott Robbins
Candidate for Governor
Scott Robbins
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Scott Robbins
Candidate for Governor
Republican

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Candidate voted out in GOP Convention on April 27, 2024.

Candidate's Response on:

Student Loan Forgiveness

I think people need to follow through with their commitments. Student loan forgiveness just leads to a tax burden and inflation for the rest of society and those who never took a loan. I also think universities and the government need to stop handing out loans so easily and having high interest rates. There also needs to be transparency for the students on the value of a degree they are considering, and more students need to be informed of occupations that don't require college. Too often students can rack up thousands in debt for useless degrees. Debt better used for a home.

Housing Affordability

The main issue are high interest rates, which we don't control. That itself is a scam as private banks decide to raise interest rates, and then have record breaking profits off the higher interest rates. But currently the state is offering lower interest loans to builders to build more affordable housing. I also have read making homes smaller and their lots smaller, can help create more affordable homes. Utah also needs to stop supporting illegal immigration. Illegal immigration has been the principal cause of population growth for the last few years at least and has contributed to the increase in housing prices.

College Affordability

I've read part of the problem is that only some colleges can get loans, and other types of schooling don't qualify, allowing them to increase prices. That's more of a federal issue though. But I think transparency about employment rates based on degrees, and better knowledge on the cost of loans over the next 10-20 years can better help students make informed decisions. We also need to better educate our youth on alternative methods of education, whether certificates, online schools, or trade schools, etc. Any we need to look into all ways to make a good education more affordable and worthwhile for  our people. If we had online classes during Covid, why can't we after and for a cheaper price than in-class schooling? 

Elections Policy

I support any efforts to have a transparent and honest election. The people of Utah deserve to have confidence in the election process. Currently Republicans and Democrats have high confidence in Utah's election process and audits of past elections showed minimal discrepancies. Of course there's always room for improvement.

Land Conservation

This is our land and we live off it so we better take care of it. I think we as a state can do better with avoiding litter, waste, and keeping our waters clean, etc. I'm all for practical ways to improve our air, land, and water quality. It would be great to only use renewable energy, and I think once renewable energy becomes more sustainable people will gladly use it. I think we also need to watch the water availability in the state and make sure we're not solely focused on growth when there isn't water available. I also support our people having control over our lands, since the federal government currently controls 63% of it.