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Image of Wioletta Fedeczko

’She Must Be a Rare One’: The Rhetoric of an Invisible Woman

Wioleta Fedeczko; Faculty Senate President, Associate Professor of English

February 15, 2024 - 1:00pm

Plato calls her his “excellent mistress in the art of rhetoric” and gave her credit for many of Pericles’ famous speeches in ancient Greece. Plutarch claims that she was a respected Athenian teacher of “the art of speaking.” Socrates gives her credit for developing rhetorical elements that we still teach today, like the concept of the “topic” when writing. Who is this woman whose ideas and speeches were only copied, referenced, and recorded by men? She is Aspasia of Miletus—an immigrant, a non-citizen, a woman never acknowledged by statues or portraits or stained-glass murals. In this presentation, we will wander the streets of ancient Greece with Aspasia and consider how knowledge is made and who gets credit.

More about the Presenter

Wioleta Fedeczko immigrated to the United States from Wodzisław Słąski, Poland in 1984. She received a B.A. in English (creative writing) from the University of Idaho in Moscow, an M.S. in English (technical communication) from Towson University in Maryland, and a Ph.D. in English (rhetoric and composition) from Miami University in Oxford, Ohio. Her research focuses on rhetorics of citizenship and immigration, and she’s currently working on her book, Geography of the Tongue.

Image of Hannah Rowntree

Reclaiming Our Journey Through the Outdoors

R.E.C.CLAIM UTAH

February 22, 2024 - 1:00pm

What has been your journey through outdoor recreation? For many in Utah, growing up outdoors is a natural, joyous part of life. However, what about those in our community who face social, economic, and racial barriers that deny them access to the outdoors? R.E.C.CLAIM UTAH—a community collective designed for queer, trans, Black, Indigenous, and women of color to find rest and joy in outdoor recreation—invites you to join them for a touching presentation to learn how a group of five women of color are overcoming these barriers through rest, education, and community.

More about the Presenter

In the spring of 2023, Hannah and Alex entered the Center for Social Impact's research competition, "Design for Impact," to pitch a prototype that addresses a social issue in the area. Through intensive research, a series of workshops, and based on lived experience, R.E.C.CLAIM UTAH was created to address the disparities women of color face in outdoor recreation in Utah County.

Throughout this summer, Estrella, Ivette, Bri, and Luci joined the team. Alex and Estrella are current UVU students; Ivette is UVU's new program director for clubs; Bri is a yoga teacher; Luci is a massage therapist; and Hannah recently moved to Oakland, CA, for a fellowship at the Greenlining Institute. Between this team's multiple jobs, schooling, and passions, their work builds a sense of belonging and community.

Kiona Wilson graduated from UVU with a degree in philosophy; she’s currently working and taking a gap year to prepare for graduate studies in editing and publishing. During all seasons, you can find her foraging, planning a garden, or reading about ecology and sustainable agriculture practices.

Pie and AI - artistic image of robot holding pie and speaking binary

Pie & AI: Academic Research with Generative AI (Part 1: The Intro)

Fulton Library

February 27, 2024 - 12:00-12:30pm

Join your UVU Librarians in an engaging workshop exploring how undergraduate students can utilize generative AI in navigating and interacting with academic sources for research assignments. Pie will be served!

Stained-glass image example of historic black figures.

Themed Tour: Black History

Rob Line’s Sociology Class

February 28, 2024 - 2pm-3pm

Join us on the last Wednesday of every month for popcorn, prizes, and a new theme! This month’s theme is Black History, and we are hosting students, faculty, and staff from around campus to share about items in Roots of Knowledge that are a part of Black History.

Utah Black History Museum

Utah Black History Museum Exhibit

Trevor Warburton

March 2024

Hosted by UVU's School of Education and Roots of Knowledge, the Utah Black History Museum will exhibit in the Roots of Knowledge Bingham Gallery in the Fulton Library, March 2 - 30. The Utah Black History Museum is the first and only museum in Utah solely dedicated to the celebration and dissemination of Black History and Culture. Launched in February 2020, this museum is committed to promoting the understanding, appreciation, and advancement of the Black experience in Utah through programming, exhibits, and activities that teach local and national Black history and celebrate the culture of the African Diaspora in the United States.

Pie and AI - artistic image of robot holding pie and speaking binary

Pie & AI: Academic Research with Generative AI (Part 2: Be a Pro!)

Fulton Library

March 4, 2024 – 12:00-12:30pm

Curious how you can use AI to manage your bibliography or works cited page? Need ideas on how Generative AI can help your searching process for a literature review? Join your UVU Librarians in an engaging workshop exploring how undergraduate students can utilize generative AI in navigating and interacting with academic sources for research assignments. Pie will be served!

Image of Kelly Hall

Roots of Leadership: Exploring Leader Character & Women Leaders Throughout History

Kelly Hall; Assistant Professor of Organizational Leadership; Director, Women's Business Leadership Initiative; Academic Director, Research Institute at the Women's Success Center

March 7, 2024 - 1:00pm

Effective leadership is rooted in leader character, which shapes our interactions, priorities, decision-making approaches, and actions. Extensive research highlights the relationship between leader character and individual and organizational outcomes, for example, executive performance, well-being, customer retention, and innovation. In this presentation, I will delve into the key dimensions of leader character and explore ways leaders can strengthen their character. The profound symbolism embedded in Roots of Knowledge will guide the exploration of leader character. By drawing parallels between character dimensions and the stories of leaders from times past, attendees will gain insights for enhanced leadership effectiveness. In honor of Women’s History Month, this talk will also emphasize leader character lessons from women leaders throughout history.

More about the Presenter

Dr. Kelly Hall, assistant professor of organizational leadership at Utah Valley University, is also director of the Women's Business Leadership Initiative, academic director of the Research Institute at the Women's Success Center, and lead faculty of the UVU Executive Education Women's Leadership Program. With more than a decade of experience in higher education and executive education development, she has been recognized for her teaching, leadership development, and community involvement. Dr. Hall has received prestigious awards such as the Distinguished EMBA Professor Award, Outstanding Innovator Award, COVID-19 Innovation Award, and Provost Faculty Fellow for Engagement. Dr. Hall is passionate about blending research with course design to create a synergy between scholarship and teaching. Her research interests include leadership development, women at work, employee learning, and positive organizational scholarship. She actively collaborates with interdisciplinary researchers and is involved in various management organizations. Before academia, Kelly worked in the financial industry, holding positions as a branch manager at Raymond James Financial and senior member of the learning and development team at Washington Mutual Bank / JP Morgan Chase.

Image of Heather Wilson

The Power of Human Connection to Lift the Individual, Community and Society

Heather Wilson-Ashworth; Professor

March 21, 2024 - 1:00pm

This presentation aims to systematically examine the multifaceted repercussions of human connection on diverse aspects of human well-being. Specifically, it will delve into the consequential influence of interpersonal relationships on human health, elucidate how fostering connections contributes to elevated student retention rates and overall success in the realm of education, and underscore the pivotal role of human connectivity in advancing various domains, such as science, medicine, political discourse, and societal reform. Through a comprehensive exploration of these interconnected themes, we seek to elucidate the profound implications that human interaction holds for individual and collective progress across these critical domains.

More about the Presenter

Dr. Heather Wilson-Ashworth is a seasoned professor of biology with 23 years of experience at Utah Valley University. Currently, she represents the UVU chapter on the Utah Women in Higher Education Network board and serves as a co-investigator for the National Science Foundation grant, "Faculty-Mentored Experiences for Improving Undergraduate Biology Student Outcomes," showcasing her active engagement in academic leadership and research. Her research focuses on factors influencing UVU student success, retention, and motivation, particularly emphasizing the challenges faced by underrepresented groups in STEM fields.

Dr. Wilson-Ashworth's accolades include notable awards, such as first place in the UVU Design of a UVU Online Course (2023), the UVU Alumni Association Distinguished Service Award (2021), the national POGIL Early Career Achievement Award (2020), the UVU Distinguished Service Award (2021), the UVU Student Advocate Award (2019), third place in the UVU Design of a UVU Online Course (2019), and the UVU Presidential Award of Excellence in Engagement (2018). She holds a doctorate in zoology from Brigham Young University, reflecting her academic expertise.

Stained-glass image of historic women of note.

Themed Tour: Women’s History

Rob Line’s Sociology Class & Women of UVU

March 27, 2024 - 2pm-3pm

Join us on the last Wednesday of every month for popcorn, prizes, and a new theme! This month’s theme is Women’s History, and we are hosting students, faculty, and staff from around campus to share about items in Roots of Knowledge that are a part of the story of civic engagement throughout history.

Image of Alex Nibley

Beyond Measure

Alex Nibley; Assistant Professor

April 4, 2024 - 1:00pm

In a modern world obsessed with data and metrics, how do we make sure not to neglect the all-important aspects of education and culture that elude easy quantification? How do you measure qualities such as inspiration, creativity, and compassion? Can you measure beauty? And if not, does that make these qualities less important, or even nonexistent? Looking at Roots of Knowledge, we see many of the greatest teachers in history, such as Socrates, Siddhartha Gautama, Jesus of Nazareth, Abraham Lincoln, and more. So we ask the question: How would these teachers, whose words continue to resonate centuries and millennia after their deaths, fit in to a metrics and data-based learning paradigm? And did they have something that our society is in danger of losing?

More about the Presenter

Alex Nibley is an actor, writer, and filmmaker who has taught film analysis and screenwriting at UVU for over two decades. As a pioneer of the digital cinema program, he designed the curriculum for the Storytelling for Digital Media specialty track and the Writing for Entertainment Media minor. Originally trained as an actor, he holds a Master of Fine Arts from the American Conservatory Theater and a BA from the University of Utah in mass communication. He was personally mentored by Frank Daniel, founding artistic director of the Sundance Institute, and teaches the “Daniel Methodology” approach to cinematic storytelling at UVU. His most recent work includes a prominent acting role in Kevin Costner’s forthcoming epic, Horizon: An American Saga, and a Fulbright residency in Indonesia, where he worked with native film professors to design curriculum and pedagogy for the fourth-largest country in the world.

Image of Chitralekha Duttagupta

Literacy Roots: Writing, Reading and the Tree of Knowledge

Chitralekha Duttagupta; Associate Professor

April 11, 2024 - 1:00pm

This presentation will focus on writing and reading, driven by curiosity, as the root of all knowledge. As a professor of literacy, it has been my job to encourage students to use these literacy skills to push their academic boundaries and venture into the “great academic unknown.” The human race arrived at the twenty-first century through exploration and innovation, fueled by curiosity and a desire to learn. In this process, writing, reading, and interpreting were key. In my presentation, I will discuss human writing development through the centuries, beginning with the cave paintings in Mesopotamia to the modern-day writing classroom where I teach, where student writers have the latest technologies at their fingertips. I will also discuss how writing and reading helps students to engage and express, so the roots laid down by our ancestors can grow deeper into the ground and the knowledge tree can continue to bear more fruit for all humans.

More about the Presenter

Dr. Duttagupta is an associate professor in Utah Valley University’s Department of Literacies and Composition, which will soon merge with the Department of English. She has taught writing courses at UVU since August 2008. She earned a Ph.D. in rhetoric and composition and master’s in teaching English from Arizona State University. Her rhetoric interests include the scholarship of rhetoric and composition, basic writing, and second language writing. She loves to read, both fiction and non-fiction, and loves to travel.

Image of Roots of Knowledge event crowd

Refugee Awareness and Resource Forum

Multicultural Student Services, Utah Valley Refugees, Language Barrier Accommodations, Centro Hispano

April 16, 2024 - 11am-2pm

Refugees Awareness and Resources Forum, taking place April 16, 2024, from 11 am to 2 pm, will be held in the Roots of Knowledge (Bingham Gallery) at Utah Valley University.
A discussion panel of members of our refugee community and resource reps to participate in the development of refugee strategies and policies in an effective and meaningful manner. It will be a day of inspiration, cultural and design exchange, a call to action built on previous efforts, and an invitation to imagine what new possibilities there are to design solutions for underserved, displaced populations.

Stained-glass image from the Roots of Knowledge installation.

Themed Tour: Environmentalist History

Rob Line’s Sociology Class

April 24, 2024 - 2pm-3pm

Join us on the last Wednesday of every month for popcorn, prizes, and a new theme! This month’s theme is Environmentalist History, and we are hosting students, faculty, and staff from around campus to share about items in Roots of Knowledge that are a part of the story of Environmentalism throughout history.