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American Sign Language

 
ASL-American Sign Language
ASL 1000
Introduction to the Deaf World
3:3:0
On Sufficient Demand

Focuses on the nature, make up, and significance of the Deaf-World as a linguistic and cultural minority group. Gives significant attention to the different ways that deaf people form a minority group thereby adding diversity to society at large. Also addresses the diversity within the group and the sociological factors that affect its makeup. Introduces American Sign Language (ASL) and teaches some basic conversational skills. Gives special attention to the differences between the ways hearing and Deaf people construct meanings associated with deaf people. Taught in (or interpreted into) English.

ASL 1010 LH
Beginning American Sign Language I
4:4:1
Fall, Spring, Summer

Introduces American Sign Language (ASL) to students with no previous experience with ASL. Employs an immersion approach to language learning. Emphasizes basic expressive and receptive conversational skills. Includes introduction to American Deaf culture. Requires weekly lab. Lab access fee of $10 applies. Lab access fee of $10 applies.

ASL 1020 LH
Beginning American Sign Language II
4:4:1
Fall, Spring, Summer
Prerequisite(s):
Students should have equivalent knowledge of ASL 1010

Builds on the experiences in ASL 1010. Emphasizes basic expressive and receptive conversational skills through active student participation. Continues introduction to American Deaf culture. Employs an immersion approach to language learning. Requires a weekly lab. Lab access fee of $10 applies.

ASL 115R
ASL Conversation I
1:1:0

Offers novice ASL users opportunities to enhance their proficiency in the target language by focusing on production. Teaches how to improve authentic pronunciation, reduce errors in authenticity of language structure, generate thought in the target language spontaneously as a substitute for translation, and sharpen comprehension for natural conversational flow. Contrasts with all other first-year courses which must strive to produce mastery of the whole range of language acquisition components. Facilitates lowering the affective filter when conversing in the target language by increasing the frequency of conversational opportunities. Increases mastery of lexical items through increased frequency of use. May be repeated for a maximum of 3 credits toward graduation. Taught in ASL.

ASL 2010 LH
Intermediate American Sign Language I
4:4:1
Fall, Spring, Summer
Prerequisite(s):
Students should have equivalent knowledge of ASL 1020

Reviews and builds upon the grammar and conversation skills learned in the first year courses. Concentrates on understanding and acquiring more advanced conversational proficiency in ASL. Emphasizes the use of various kinds of ASL classifiers in the function of describing objects and in providing locative information. Analyzes Deaf culture with an emphasis on the struggles of this linguistic minority with a majority controlled educational establishment with particular attention to the effects on individual Deaf lives. Lab access fee of $10 for applies.

ASL 202G HH
Intermediate American Sign Language II
4:4:0
Fall, Spring
Prerequisite(s):
Students should have equivalent knowledge of ASL 2010

Continues applied conversation use of ASL through literature, narratives, poetry, and creative sign play. Analyzes ASL grammatical principles and Deaf cultural experiences to explore and understand various underlying metaphors found in ASL literature. Requires Deaf community exposure and involvement. Lab access fee of $10 applies.

ASL 2030
Advanced Fingerspelling
1:1:0
Fall, Spring
Prerequisite(s):
ASL 1020 or equivalent knowledge

Focuses on the patterns of ASL fingerspelling, one of the hardest ASL skills to master. Increases ability to accurately produce and comprehend ASL fingerspelling. Gives attention to the nature and application of fingerspelling within the sociocultural context of the Deaf-World. Taught in ASL.

ASL 2040
ASL Numbers
1:1:0
Fall, Spring
Prerequisite(s):
ASL 1020 or equivalent knowledge

Focuses on the complex rule systems governing ASL numbers as used in a wide range of settings. Increases ability to accurately produce and comprehend contextually situated ASL numbers. Taught in ASL.

ASL 2050
Advanced ASL Grammar
3:3:0
Prerequisite(s):
Students should have equivalent knowledge of ASL 202G

Explores the grammar of ASL focusing on areas typically difficult for English speakers, particularly ASL classifiers. Provides extensive instruction and opportunity for students to improve both comprehension and production through regular interaction. Taught in ASL. Lab access fee of $10 applies.

ASL 2060
Using Space in ASL
3:3:1
On Sufficient Demand
Prerequisite(s):
ASL 2050

Studies the use of space in ASL productions and how to visualize and describe spatial relationships using ASL. Emphasizes skills necessary to describe space from different angles and point of views, focusing on areas typically difficult for English speakers. Provides extensive instruction and opportunity for students to improve both comprehension and production. Taught in ASL.

ASL 215R
ASL Conversation II
1:1:0
Prerequisite(s):
Students should have equivalent knowledge of ASL 1020

Offers lower division/novice ASL users opportunities to enhance their proficiency in the target language by focusing on production. Teaches how to improve authentic pronunciation, reduce errors in authenticity of language structure, generate thought in the target language spontaneously as a substitute for translation, sharpen comprehension, and develop conversational strategies such as circumlocution and managing a conversation with useful expressions for starting a conversation, gaining time to think, helping interlocutors, seeking agreement, etc. Contrasts with all other first year courses which must strive to produce mastery of the whole range of language acquisition components. Facilitates lowering the affective filter when conversing in the target language by increasing the frequency of production opportunities and defusing concern about new vocabulary and grammar. Increases mastery of lexical items through increased frequency of use. May be repeated for a maximum of 3 credits toward graduation.

ASL 3000
Technology for Deaf Studies
3:3:1
Fall, Spring
Prerequisite(s):
ASL 201G or equivalent

Examines various forms of media that will help Deaf Studies students succeed in both the pursuit of their academic degrees and in real-world work environments. Draws on the theoretical approaches of the Visual Culture field to explore visual theory, museums, memorials, film and video. Gives in-depth instruction in the use of multiple digital technologies used in higher-level Deaf Studies classes and in work environments associated with Deaf people. Taught in ASL.

ASL 3010
Foundations and Theory and Methods of Deaf Studies
3:3:0
On Sufficient Demand
Prerequisite(s):
(ASL 202G or equivalent) and University Advanced Standing

Provides Deaf Studies students a foundation for further study. Covers three areas: (1) significant persons and events in the Deaf-World which are often referenced in later courses; (2) significant theoretical approaches in the field; and (3) fundamentals of conducting research. Lays the foundation for students to engage in meaningful inquiry in upper-division coursework. Taught in ASL.

ASL 3050
Advanced American Sign Language
3:3:0
Fall, Spring, Summer
Prerequisite(s):
ASL 202G or instructor approval

Designed for students who have attained a fairly good mastery of basic ASL. Focuses on grammatical and linguistic aspects of ASL, including sign formation, morphological structures, syntactic structures, pronominalization, identification and analysis of subjects and objects, classifiers, depicting verbs, pluralization, time concepts, and social interaction of language and culture within Deaf communities. Lab access fee of $10 applies.

ASL 315R
ASL Conversation III
1:1:0
Prerequisite(s):
(ASL 202G or equivalent knowledge) and University Advanced Standing

Offers intermediate ASL users opportunities to enhance their proficiency in the target language by focusing on production. Centers on discussions from a selected reading list in 'book club' form. Teaches how to improve authentic pronunciation, reduce errors in authenticity of language structure, generate thought in the target language spontaneously as a substitute for translation, and sharpen comprehension for natural conversational flow. Contrasts with all other third-year courses which are more content based. Facilitates lowering the affective filter when conversing in the target language by increasing the frequency of conversational opportunities. May be repeated for a maximum of 3 credits toward graduation.

ASL 3310
Foundations of Interpreting
3:3:0
Fall, Spring
Prerequisite(s):
ASL 3050 and University Advanced Standing

Introduces bidirectional (ASL-to-English and English-to-ASL) interpreting between Deaf and hearing people. Studies the profession and skills necessary to be an interpreter. Includes history, models, and professional certification procedures of interpreting; cognitive processes, physical and psychological factors, intercultural communication, ethics, and situational interpreting. Deaf students are encouraged to enroll. May be delivered online.

ASL 3320
Physiology of Interpreting
3:3:0
On Sufficient Demand
Prerequisite(s):
ASL 202G and University Advanced Standing

Introduces students to skills and processes required to maintain health and wellbeing in the physically demanding and high stress field of interpreting. Develops cognitive, ergonomic, and dual tasking abilities required to interpret without stress or physical injury. Helps students better understand how a healthly lifestyle and developing good habits can improve thier skills and prevent injury. Lab access fee of $10 applies.

ASL 3330
Cross Cultural Communication and Interpreting
3:3:0
Fall, Spring
Prerequisite(s):
ASL 3310 and University Advanced Standing.

Builds on ASL 3310. Focuses heavily on the practice of interpreting with special emphasis on the dimension of intercultural communication. Requires regular skill-building exercises in both consecutive and simultaneous interpretation, both English-to-ASL and ASL-to-English. Deaf students are encouraged to enroll. Taught in ASL. Lab access fee of $10 applies.

ASL 3340
Interpreting as a Profession
3:3:0
Fall, Spring
Prerequisite(s):
ASL 3310 and University Advanced Standing

Builds on the principles (ASL-to-English and English-to-ASL) for interpreting between Deaf and hearing people taught in Interpreting I. Studies the profession and skills necessary to be an interpreter in more specialized settings such as medical, legal, mental health, and theatre. Includes history, models, and professional certification procedures of interpreting; cognitive processes, physical and psychological factors, intercultural communication, ethics, and situational interpreting. Deaf students are encouraged to enroll. Lab access fee of $10 applies.

ASL 3350
Consecutive Interpreting
3:3:1
On Sufficient Demand
Prerequisite(s):
ASL 3310, matriculation into the Interpreting Emphasis, and University Advanced Standing

Introduces skills and processes required to produce consecutive interpretations. Focuses on developing basic cognitive, semantic, and dual tasking abilities required to interpret rehearsed and/or spontaneous texts. Teaches to incorporate semantic choice, register, and ethical behavioral decisions and understand how they impact interpretation. Develops sets of technical or field-specific signs and applyies these to interpretative work. Includes one-hour per week lab. Taught in ASL. Lab access fee of $10 applies.

ASL 3360
Simultaneous Interpreting
3:3:1
Fall, Spring
Prerequisite(s):
ASL 3350 and matriculation into the Interpreting Emphasis and University Advanced Standing

Introduces skills and processes required to produce simultaneous interpretations. Focuses on transitioning from consecutive interpreting to time-limited simultaneous interpreting. Develops cognitive, semantic, and dual tasking abilities required to interpret spontaneous texts. Teaches and incorporates more advanced semantic choices and negotiation techniques. Works with a variety of audience sizes and types. Teaches how ethics impact behavioral decisions and interpretations. Gives more consideration to developing sets of technical or field-specific signs and applying these to interpretative work. Includes one-hour per week lab. Taught in ASL. Lab access fee of $10 applies.

ASL 3365
Deaf Interpreting in the Community
3:3:1
Prerequisite(s):
ASL 3310 and University Advanced Standing

Examines the roles, responsibilities and benefits of Certified Deaf Interpreters. Prepares Deaf interpreters for certification as Certified Deaf Interpreters (as recognized by the Registry of Interpreters for the Deaf). Prepares hearing interpreters to work in teams with Deaf interpreters. Examines settings, ethics, roles, theory and hands-on exercises.

ASL 3370
Sign to Voice Interpreting
3:3:1
Fall, Spring
Prerequisite(s):
ASL 3360 and matriculation into the Interpreting Emphasis and University Advanced Standing

Introduces skills and processes required to produce conceptually accurate and linguistically appropriate voice interpretations of ASL texts. Develops cognitive, semantic, and dual tasking abilities required to interpret spontaneous texts. Teaches and incorporates more advanced semantic choices and negotiation techniques.Works with a variety of audience sizes and types. Teaches how ethics impact behavioral decisions and interpretations. Gives more consideration to developing sets of technical or field-specific signs and applying these to interpretative work. Includes one-hour per week lab. Lab access fee of $10 applies.

ASL 3380
Transliteration
3:3:1
Fall, Spring
Prerequisite(s):
ASL 3360, matriculation into the Interpreting Emphasis and University Advanced Standing

Introduces skills and processes required to produce conceptually accurate and linguistically appropriate messages using ASL signs in an English word order. Develops cognitive, semantic, and dual tasking abilities required to interpret spontaneous texts. Teaches and incorporates more advanced semantic choices and negotiation techniques. Works with a variety of audience sizes and types. Teaches how ethics impact behavioral decisions and interpretations. Gives more consideration to developing sets of technical or field-specific signs and applying these to interpretative work. Includes one-hour per week lab. Lab access fee of $10 applies.

ASL 3390
Professional Issues in Interpreting
3:3:0
On Sufficient Demand
Prerequisite(s):
ASL 3310 and University Advanced Standing

Provides students advanced study and skills development in the business and profession of interpreting, decision making while interpreting between Deaf (including Deaf-blind) and hearing populations, and negotiation of the complex and growing field of interpreting. Students develop the understanding of the day to day demands of the work needed become truly professional interpreters. Provides extensive individual feedback. Lab access fee of $10 applies.

ASL 3510
History of Deaf People to 1817
3:3:0
Fall, Spring
Prerequisite(s):
ASL 202G or equivalent knowledge and University Advanced Standing

Explores chronologically to 1817 the formation and treatment of the Deaf community and culture. Emphasizes the rise of deaf education in a European setting and on the links to American Deaf education. Examines perceptions of deaf people and language across this period. Taught in ASL.

ASL 3520
History of Deaf People after 1817
3:3:0
Fall, Spring
Prerequisite(s):
ASL 202G or equivalent and University Advanced Standing

Explores the evolution and treatment of the Deaf community and culture emphasizing activities in the United States chronologically from 1817 onward. Emphasizes the rise of oralism, the development of deaf residential schools, the emergence of American Deaf culture and the recognition of ASL as a true language. Taught in ASL.

ASL 3530
Modern Deaf Culture
3:3:0
Fall, Spring
Prerequisite(s):
ASL 202G or equivalent knowledge and University Advanced Standing

Explores the culture of the American Deaf people following the recognition of American Sign Language as a legitimate, naturally-occurring sign language. Examines constructions of Deaf people as a linguistic minority whose mores, beliefs, values and traditions emanate from a shared worldview that differs markedly from the view usually ascribed to them by non-intimates. Taught in ASL. May be delivered hybrid and/or online.

ASL 3610
ASL Literature
3:3:0
Fall, Spring
Prerequisite(s):
ASL 3050 and University Advanced Standing

Explores the dynamics of ASL literature and its traditions by studying various genres and ASL storytellers. Uses the similarities and differences in the development of traditional oral literature in other cultures to ASL literature as a tool in discussions and critiques. Covers general narratives and the unique aspects and techniques of telling stories in sign language. Teaches how to critique and to produce ASL literature. Taught in ASL. May be delivered hybrid and/or online.

ASL 3710
Deaf View/Image Art--De'VIA
3:3:0
Fall
Prerequisite(s):
ASL 3050 and (ASL 3510 or 3520 or 3530) and University Advanced Standing

Explores the role of visual arts in the Deaf-World with particular attention to Deaf/View Image Art (De'VIA) whose subject matter and style represent a Deaf worldview. Examines the historical contributions of early Deaf artists in various art periods. Takes as a reference other art movements stemming from oppression. Studies various artworks as well as Deaf artists' descriptions of their work, including their aims, motivations, and challenges. Taught in ASL. May be delivered hybrid.

ASL 3750
Deaf Cinema
3:3:0
Spring
Prerequisite(s):
ASL 3050 and University Advanced Standing

Examines the critical role film plays in Deaf culture and the Deaf community. Uses film as a background to critically think about and address key issues that Deaf people encounter in society. Studies various lenses of Deaf themes and Deaf characters in movies, as well as how Deaf people have been involved with creating movies throughout history and contrasts this with the ways film has been a mold for the ideology and identity of Deaf people. Introduces concepts of film composition and critiquing tools. Taught in ASL. May be delivered hybrid.

ASL 385G
Audism/Linguicism/Oppression
3:3:0
Fall, Spring
Prerequisite(s):
[ASL 3050 and (ASL 3510 or ASL 3520 or ASL 3530) or department approval] and University Advanced Standing

Examines oppression in various forms through a comparative study spanning across cultures and communities. Examines the parallels between widely-understood forms of oppression and those specific to the Deaf-World. Fulfills Global/Intercultural graduation requirement.

ASL 415R
ASL Conversation IV
1:1:0
Prerequisite(s):
ASL 3050 and University Advanced Standing

Offers intermediate/advanced ASL users opportunities to enhance their proficiency in the target language by focusing on production. Centers on discussions from a selected reading list in 'book club' form. Teaches how to improve authentic pronunciation, reduce errors in authenticity of language structure, generate thought in the target language spontaneously as a substitute for translation, and sharpen comprehension for natural conversational flow. Contrasts with all other upper division ASL courses which are more content based. Facilitates lowering the affective filter when conversing in the target language by increasing the frequency of conversational opportunities. May be repeated for a maximum of 3 credits toward graduation.

ASL 4330
Visual Linguistic Analysis for Interpreters
3:3:1
Fall, Spring
Prerequisite(s):
ASL 3350, matriculation into the Interpreting Emphasis and University Advanced Standing

Teaches necessary processing skills related to interpreting from Sign to spoken languages including ability to concentrate and analyze visual linguistic and non-manual markers. Analyzes discourse focusing on context, linguistics and culture. Lab required. Lab access fee of $10 applies.

ASL 4360
Legal Interpreting
3:3:0
On Sufficient Demand
Prerequisite(s):
ASL 3350 and matriculation into the Interpreting Emphasis and University Advanced Standing

Provides a conceptual understanding of the American legal system, and the unique cultural challenges related to interpreting for parties within the system. Examines both the law and Deafness and the areas of language and cultural mediation required to effectively facilitate communication between people who are Deaf and people who are hearing in legal settings. Lab access fee of $10 applies.

ASL 4370
Ethics for Interpreters
3:3:0
Spring
Prerequisite(s):
ASL 3310 and University Advanced Standing

Provides students advanced study and skills development in ethical decision making while interpreting between Deaf (including Deaf-blind) and hearing populations, including interpreting in: Educational, Higher Ed. Legal, Mental Health and Medical situations. Helps students develop the ethical understanding needed to become truly professional interpreters. Provides extensive individual feedback to rapidly improve students' interpreting skills and understanding of the complex nature of interpreting ethics. Lab access fee of $10 applies.

ASL 4380
Applying Interpreting Skills to Coursework--Medical
3:3:0
On Sufficient Demand
Prerequisite(s):
ASL 3350; ASL 3360, matriculation into the Interpreting Emphasis, and University Advanced Standing.

Guides interpreters through skill sets applied to real life classroom lectures, specifically medical and psychology courses offered online through accredited universities. Requires practical application of specific interpreting skills and techniques as will as course preparation and acquisition of course specific knowledge to develop balanced interpreting practices, including both specific applicable skills in interpretation and a broad based liberal arts knowledge to which the skills are applied.

ASL 4381
Applying Interpreting Skills to Coursework--Law
3:3:0
Fall, Spring
Prerequisite(s):
ASL 3350, ASL 3360, matriculation into the Interpreting Emphasis, and University Advanced Standing.

Guides interpreters through skill sets applied to real life classroom lectures, specifically law and justice courses offered online through accredited universities and sample courtroom scenarios. Requires practical application of specific interpreting skills and techniques as well as course preparation and acquisition of course specific knowledge to develop balanced interpreting practices, including both specific applicable skills in interpretation and a broad based liberal arts knowledge to which the skills are applied.

ASL 4382
Applying Interpreting Skills to Coursework--Education
3:3:0
On Sufficient Demand
Prerequisite(s):
ASL 3350, ASL 3360, matriculation into the Interpreting Emphasis, and University Advanced Standing.

Guides interpreters through skill sets applied to real life classroom lectures, specifically education and other courses offered online through accredited universities. Requires practical application of specific interpreting skills and techniques as will as course preparation and acquisition of course specific knowledge to develop balanced interpreting practices, including both specific applicable skills in interpretation and a broad based liberal arts knowledge to which the skills are applied.

ASL 4383
Applying Interpreting Skills to Coursework--Community
3:3:0
On Sufficient Demand
Prerequisite(s):
ASL 3350, ASL 3360, matriculation into the Interpreting Emphasis, and University Advanced Standing.

Guides interpreters through skill sets applied to real life classroom lectures and instruction including business, manufacturing and organizational courses offered online through accredited universities. Requires practical application of specific interpreting skills and techniques as well as course preparation and acquisition of course specific knowledge to develop balanced interpreting practices, including both specific applicable skills in interpretation and a broad based liberal arts knowledge to which the skills are applied.

ASL 439R
Special Topics in Interpreting
3:3:1
On Sufficient Demand
Prerequisite(s):
ASL 3310 and University Advanced Standing

Provides students advanced study and skills development in interpreting between deaf (including deaf-blind) and hearing populations. Focuses on different topics as deemed appropriate (e.g., variety of academic, business, or social contexts). Helps students in the Advanced Certification Interpreter Preparation Program (ACIPP) to become bona fide professional interpreters. Provides extensive individual feedback to rapidly improve students' interpreting skills and understanding of the complex nature of the interpreting process. Repeatable up to 9 credits toward graduation. Lab access fee of $10 applies.

ASL 4410
ASL Linguistics
3:3:0
Fall, Spring
Prerequisite(s):
ASL 3050 and University Advanced Standing

Introduces the linguistic study of ASL, including phonology, morphology, syntax, semantics, and discourse structure. Emphasizes grammatical structures of ASL, including sign formation, pronominalization, identification and analysis of subjects and objects, classifiers, depicting verbs, pluralization, time concepts, and social interaction of language and culture within Deaf communities. Taught in ASL.

ASL 4450
Deaf World Discourse
3:3:0
Fall
Prerequisite(s):
ASL 3050 and University Advanced Standing

Examines the discourse practices of the Deaf-World. Studies the ways that Deaf people use discursive forms to accomplish specific social aims. Explores the semiotic connections between discursive forms and various Deaf-World identities. Adopts an anthropological bias toward real-world discourse as primary data, and prepares students to do ethnographic fieldwork in the Deaf-World. Taught in ASL.

ASL 4520
Deaf People and Disability Studies
3:3:1
Fall, Spring
Prerequisite(s):
ASL 3050 and University Advanced Standing

Introduces the field of disability studies and shows where Deaf people fit within this field. Explores the historical, social, political, religious, philosophical, and cultural influences that construct and influence the categories of "disability" and "deafness." Examines the complex relation between Deaf and disability rights groups as well as how Deaf persons and persons with disabilities construct their own meanings and identities. Taught in ASL.

ASL 4530
Deaf Peoples of the World
3:3:0
Prerequisite(s):
ASL 3530 and University Advanced Standing

Explores the lives of Deaf people in various places around the world. Considers the extent to which the deaf experience is cross-cultural and to what extent it is unique to specific locations. Explores the lifestyles, educational opportunities, political climate and level of community development of deaf people across the globe. Seeks to illuminate areas of overlap and of difference among the worldviews of various communities.

ASL 4550
Multicultural Deaf Lives
3:3:0
Fall, Spring
Prerequisite(s):
ASL 3050 and University Advanced Standing

Focuses on cultural issues, values, behaviors, identities and language of Deaf people from diverse backgrounds. Examines autobiographies, documentaries, films, videos, and academic literature to help understand the contributions and historical development of the emerging majority of the Deaf community that is underrepresented in the United States and the world. Taught in ASL. May be delivered online.

ASL 4560
Deaf People and the Law
3:3:0
Spring
Prerequisite(s):
ASL 3050 and University Advanced Standing

Focuses on the impact of laws and the legal system in the lives of people who are Deaf and the role such laws and the legal system play in the general understanding of Deafness in the United States. Explores in detail the rights of persons who are Deaf in a hearing world. Taught in ASL.

ASL 4610
ASL Literature II
3:3:0
Spring
Prerequisite(s):
ASL 3610 and University Advanced Standing

Explores the dynamics of ASL literature and its traditions by studying various genres and ASL storytellers/poets. Covers stories with handshape constraints, poetry, and songs. Taught in ASL. May be delivered hybrid and/or online.

ASL 4800
Deaf Culture Studies
3:3:0
Fall, Spring
Prerequisite(s):
(ASL 3510 or 3520 or 3530) and University Advanced Standing

Explores advanced concepts relative to American Deaf culture, including cultural conflicts, tensions, and contradictions. Provides a comprehensive study of the Deaf-World through analysis of historical events, current issues, and the expressions of Deaf people themselves. Taught in ASL. Lab access fee of $10 applies.

ASL 4850
Advanced Understanding of Oppression and Audism
3:3:0
Prerequisite(s):
ASL 385G and University Advanced Standing

Examines the various ways in which hearing people oppress Deaf people. Explores different avenues through which society has built a system of privilege based on an audiocentric center. Also examines how certain members of the Deaf community internalize audist constructions of deafness.

ASL 4890
Deaf Studies Senior Capstone
3:3:0
Prerequisite(s):
Senior status and University Advanced Standing
Prerequisite(s) or Corequisite(s):
ASL 4800

Engages students in a synthesis and critical review of what they have learned through coursework. Produces a project or thesis reflecting students' knowledge and passionate interests developed in the course of their study as a Deaf Studies major. Taught in ASL.

ASL 490R
Special Topics in Deaf Studies
1 to 3:1 to 3:0 to 1
On Sufficient Demand
Prerequisite(s):
ASL 3050 and University Advanced Standing

Presents selected topics in Deaf Studies. Varies each semester. Topics will reflect the interdisciplinary nature of the Deaf Studies field. Projects and evaluation will vary according to the topic. May be repeated for a maximum of 9 credits with different topics.

ASL 495R
Independent Study in Deaf Studies
1 to 3:1 to 3:0
On Sufficient Demand
Prerequisite(s):
For Deaf Studies students only; Instructor approval, Program Coordinator/Department Chair approval, and University Advanced Standing

Provides independent study as directed in reading and individual projects specifically related to the Deaf Studies field at the discretion and approval of the Dean and/or Department Chair. May be repeated for a maximum of 6 credits toward graduation.